Air compressor powered by a generator

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  #1  
Old 12-21-15, 06:00 AM
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Air compressor powered by a generator

I'm trying to connect an air compressor to a generator this is what I have

Generator is a Champion Power Equipment 6250W / 5000W Gasoline Portable Generator
It has a 120/240 volt NEMA L14-30R

Air compressor is a Industrial Air 60 Gallon Belt Drive Air Compressor
It requires 230 volts 15 amps 60hz 1phase

The generator is a 4 wire and the air compressor is a 3 wire. I was wondering is it possible to buy the 3 wire cord and put the 4 wire plug to it and just jump the two 120 pins to make the 240 volts go to one wire?

Is this possible? If so what size wire can I use?

Links to items I bought

http://www.farmandfleet.com/m/products/605034-industrial-air-60-gallon-belt-drive-air-compressor.html

http://www.farmandfleet.com/m/products/817024-champion-power-equipment-6250w-5000w-gasoline-portable-generator.html
 

Last edited by Diego Sanchez; 12-21-15 at 06:03 AM. Reason: links on what I bought
  #2  
Old 12-21-15, 06:39 AM
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Welcome to the forums Diego!

I doubt that is enough genny for the compressor. I have a 5000 watt compressor and an old 1hp air compressor and while it would run it, the generator really isn't stout enough. But some of the others know more than me so wait and see what they say.
 
  #3  
Old 12-21-15, 06:51 AM
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I hope it is because I did the math to find the watts it runs on and it seemed like it was enough but I'm no expert either
 
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Old 12-21-15, 06:57 AM
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I have a similar spec'd generator and the ratings are highly inflated but it could be worth a try @ 240 volts, just make sure the engine is warmed up before you try the compressor.

I know of no pre-made adapter you speak of but it is common to buy components to do it yourself.
A male twist lock connector to fit the generator and female receptacle with a cover in a jctn box would do it for you.
Wire this combination with the two hots feeding the receptacle.
You could even make yourself a multi-use cord with 240 volt and 120 volt receptacles mounted to a board.

I can't see the specs for the receptacle on gen and plug on compressor but that should be in the manual.

Also, if you use premium fuel, stabilizer if stored for long periods and regularly test run WITH A LOAD you will get fairly good service out of that generator.
 
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Old 12-21-15, 07:07 AM
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The generator is a 4 wire and the air compressor is a 3 wire. I was wondering is it possible to buy the 3 wire cord and put the 4 wire plug to it and just jump the two 120 pins to make the 240 volts go to one wire?
You don't jump anything. The generator has hot, hot, neutral, and ground. Your compressor has hot, hot, and ground. No neutral is needed for 240 volts.

Just make your own adapter.
 
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Old 12-21-15, 07:16 AM
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Thanx yeah that's what I was thinking about doing just making the plug myself
 
  #7  
Old 12-21-15, 07:24 AM
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Ok what wire gauge should I use thanx
 

Last edited by Diego Sanchez; 12-21-15 at 08:05 AM.
  #8  
Old 12-21-15, 09:24 AM
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I'd be surprised if that gennie could start that compressor motor with zero pressure in the tank and I'm almost certain it won't start at 100 psi.

I did not see in the specifications that it was rated at 15 amperes. You must also remember that a single-phase motor will take anywhere from three to five times the running amperage to start. The National Electrical Code specifies that a three-horsepower motor needs a circuit rated at 17 amperes at 230 volts and a five-horsepower motor needs 28 amperes. These are the full-load amperage figures and do NOT take into account the starting amperage. A typical starting current for that motor would be 50 amperes or more. Also, the small engine on that generator simply does not have the rotational mass to overcome the high starting current of the compressor motor. It may even stall the engine when you try to start the compressor.

There is a very good reason why compressors used away from commercial power have gasoline or diesel engines.
 
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Old 12-21-15, 09:38 AM
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Moved to Electrical forum.
 
  #10  
Old 12-21-15, 12:20 PM
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Please let us know how it turns out. I hope it works, but my guess is that the generator is too small for the compressor.
 
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Old 12-21-15, 12:40 PM
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I guess I'll see what happens. It seems like it won't work but I'll give it a shot and if it doesn't work I'll put it in my garage and buy a compressor that runs on fuel or something. Thanx for the help!
 
 

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