Is this the proper cable for my new range?

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  #1  
Old 12-23-15, 04:32 PM
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Is this the proper cable for my new range?

This cable connects my electric cooktop to my electrical panel (on a 30 amp breaker). I'd like to replace the cooktop with an electric range (oven and cooktop in one.)

I have two questions:

1) What gauge is this cable?
2) What size cable and breaker do I need for the range?

Attachments:
a) picture of the cable that feeds the current cooktop
b) picture of the nameplate for the new (used) range

Any help would be appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-23-15, 04:59 PM
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Can't read the tag.... what is the wattage at 240vac ?

That is 8-2 aluminum cable. To be code compliant now it needs to be three wire with ground and for a unit your size it should be 8-3 NM W/ground.

If the range is 10.5 kw at 240v .... you're looking at a 44A load.
 
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Old 12-23-15, 05:58 PM
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Is that SE by any chance copper?
 
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Old 12-23-15, 06:26 PM
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Check the breaker size now. A new stove is going to need at least a 40 amp circuit.
 
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Old 12-23-15, 06:48 PM
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The OP stated now connected to 30A breaker. That's why I assumed aluminum SE cable.
 
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Old 12-23-15, 07:45 PM
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Judging by the cable sheath, I think it is old copper SE cable. I would replace it with the 8-3 NM-B cable too and use a 40 amp breaker.
 
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Old 12-23-15, 09:38 PM
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The cable sheath DOES have type SE printed on it. Whether it is copper or aluminum I have no idea.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 06:57 AM
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If it is an EXISTING branch circuit to the range the SE would be fine if it's 8 CU.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 08:14 AM
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Thanks all for your help...

Here's a better picture of the stove nameplate. Yes, 10.5 kw at 240v.

If I'm looking at a 44 amp load, then I need a 50 amp breaker, right? Will the 8 gauge cable suffice?

Name:  stove.jpg
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  #10  
Old 12-24-15, 08:18 AM
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I think it is copper. Two copper conductors with a braided aluminum ground (as I recall; it's been a while since I was in the junction box...)

So I know there are "preferences", but I'm trying to figure out what code requires. For this stove, would 8 gauge and 40 amp breaker be adequate? I would really, really like to not have to pull new cable, but I will if it's unsafe.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 09:22 AM
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If the insulated conductors are copper the other conductor will be copper also.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 09:22 AM
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Code is 8 gauge copper is good for 40 amps so technically you need to run a new 6/3 cable and a 50 amp breaker. Reality is that the range will work fine until you have all burners on at the same time as the oven and it pops the 40 breaker after running for an hour.

If aluminum the circuit it is only good for 30 amps and your current breaker is properly sized.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 10:08 AM
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I am not experienced enough to identify the cable type just by the designation, so I need help on if the cable has an insulated neutral, not a bare ground.

IF you have an insulated neutral, and it's copper cable, this installation is most likely grandfathered.
You must ensure the bonding strap was not removed though.

A typical installation would be a 40 amp breaker.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 11:51 AM
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If I'm looking at a 44 amp load, then I need a 50 amp breaker, right? Will the 8 gauge cable suffice?
No it will not. You need a 50 amp breaker. That pretty well makes it moot. You need 6-3 NM-b. Since you are running new cable I'd suggest installing a receptacle and adding a cord set to the stove.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 11:54 AM
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Its SE so it is a braided bare neutral.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 12:25 PM
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50 amp breaker. That pretty well makes it moot. You need 6-3 NM-b
Thanks Geo. With the bare ground, you couldn't use the old cable regardless. It was good for a 240V only cook top, but the range is 120/240 and requires a neutral.
Please post back when wiring the range (with the new cable) for your safety.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 01:43 PM
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If the circuit is EXISTING it's perfectly OK to use the SE cable for ranges,dryers,just don't remove the ground strap from the neutral connection on the appliance.
Article 250-140 NEC
 
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Old 12-24-15, 02:22 PM
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The bare in the SE was allowed to be used as both the neutral and ground in a 2 wire feed. The bare in NM could not be used as the neutral/ground. It was a ground only.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 03:51 PM
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Is this the proper cable for my new range?
What does the new range installation manual say? I'll put my money on a 40 amp circuit. The last two Whirlpool electric self cleaning ranges I have bought each specified a 40 amp circuit. The one right here in this house is a 12.6 KW range and has never tripped a 40 amp breaker. To hit the maximum rating, both broil and oven elements would have to be on in the clean cycle along with all top burners on the highest setting and then the load wouldn't be continuous as the oven elements cycle on the thermostat.

Its SE so it is a braided bare neutral.
SE cable doesn't have a braided neutral. It is bare stranded.

With the bare ground, you couldn't use the old cable regardless. It was good for a 240V only cook top, but the range is 120/240 and requires a neutral.
Like PCboss stated, SE cable was allowed to be used for a 120/240 volt feed to electric ranges and dryers. The bare neutral also carried the ground.
 
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Old 12-24-15, 05:21 PM
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If the circuit is EXISTING it's perfectly OK to use the SE cable for ranges,dryers,just don't remove the ground strap from the neutral connection on the appliance.
Article 250-140 NEC
Oops. Sorry. I was under the impression (wrong impression), a bare wire could never be used as a neutral.
 
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