Add GFCI Circuit to basement

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Old 12-29-15, 01:16 PM
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Add GFCI Circuit to basement

Hey Guys,

I'm looking for some help adding a new circuit to an unfinished basement. Both of the panels are located downstairs and the house was built in 2005.

I'd like to run a 20 amp circuit and install ten outlets. This would be split between my shop, and two open bays used for a playroom/game area. My understanding is that they need to be GFCI protected in an unfinished area.

Should I use a GFCI Breaker or Outlet? What is easier or cheaper?

I may finish the playroom at some point, but the shop will always be unfinished. If/when, I'll add an additional AFCI circuit for the playroom. But, can a GFCI circuit remain in a finished room and be code compliant?

Essentially, I need to get some plugs down there safely. And I don't want to have to redo everything later if I finish it out to pass inspection.
 
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Old 12-29-15, 01:23 PM
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The gfi receptacle is cheaper than the breaker. You can leave the gfi after the area is finished.
 
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Old 12-29-15, 01:31 PM
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Everything is open now, right? If so, I'd think about maybe more than one circuit.
 
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Old 12-29-15, 01:44 PM
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Thanks for the reply.

Everything is open now, I'm just not sure what the final layout will be. HT room with dedicated server closet, etc. The ideal theater location is where shop currently is.

If I decide to finish it out, it will be about 6 circuits.

For now, a TV for the kids on one side and a few outlets to run tools will be sufficient.

To confirm, I need:

- General 20amp breaker. (How do I determine which one to buy exactly?)
- One 15 amp GFCI receptacle
- 10 regular 15 amp receptacles
- 12/2
- Blue boxes, wire hold downs, nail plates
 
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Old 12-29-15, 02:21 PM
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You determine what breaker to buy by matching it to the type of panel you have. Inside of the panel door there should be manufacturer information. You need to make sure that the breaker(s) you buy is compatible with the box. Also, when you buy the GFCI receptacle check out the instructions. Make sure they state that it can be used on a 20 amp circuit, many of them can be but there are a few that can't be.
 
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Old 12-29-15, 07:17 PM
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when you buy the GFCI receptacle check out the instructions. Make sure they state that it can be used on a 20 amp circuit, many of them can be but there are a few that can't be.
I have never seen a 15 amp GFCI receptacle that wasn't rated for 20 amp feed-through.
 
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