Converting 110V to 220V

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  #1  
Old 12-30-15, 09:57 AM
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Converting 110V to 220V

Hello everyone,

I'm new to these forums and found this site from trying to get background info on another crazy idea I had. I was wondering if there was a way to tie together the upper and lower outlet from a single 110V power receptacle to obtain 220V. It doesn't take much research to find out the answer is no and that to do so you must use two power receptacles that are on seperate legs of power.

So my question is: if I were to connect Neutral to Neutral, Hot to Hot, and Ground to Ground between two outlets on a single 110V 15 Amp power receptacle ... what would happen? Obviously I would not obtain 220 volts, so would I double my amperage to get 30 Amps or would I just start something on fire?

I don't intend to do anything... I am just new to learning about AC voltage and I have many ideas and questions and I think asking these questions will help me understand AC voltage a little better.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-30-15, 10:17 AM
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You're in way over your head talking about anything electrical if you can't answer that question yourself. Your best bet would be to go out and buy a basic electrical book and read it to give yourself some background information. Basic residential electrical is fairly simple but you definitely need to know the basics before you start getting involved at all.

In general the answer to both your questions is no although there are certain situations it might be possible.
 
  #3  
Old 12-30-15, 10:55 AM
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Ya I definitely have no experience with AC current and do not plan on doing any projects until I have a good grasp on everything. Most of my electrical experience is from 12 and 24 volt systems on vehicles. I understand basic components and the results from running series or parellel easily in a DC system; however, at this point I'm not sure if the same principles apply to AC current.

I am just trying to get some background information to compare the similarities and differences of the two types of current. I am looking for a good book to purchase I am just not sure which option will best benefit me.

As far as the original question goes, if I am understanding you correctly, utilizing this setup will not double amperage, it will definitely not double voltage, and should not pose an immediate hazard. So basically because it is run from the same original power source there will be no change?
 
  #4  
Old 12-30-15, 11:21 AM
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Well first off your house has 120/240 nominal voltage not 110/220v. A book such as Wiring Simplified will give you the basics you need.
 
  #5  
Old 12-30-15, 05:27 PM
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You may not combine or recombine the power from two receptacles..

You must never create or use a cord assembly or piece of equipment with two cord ends with male plugs interconnected with each other.
 
  #6  
Old 12-31-15, 06:26 PM
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Tapping off the same outlet will not get 220, You will just get 110 and the wire is only good for the same number of amps because its the same wire.



moderators note: removed dangerous information
 

Last edited by PJmax; 12-31-15 at 06:48 PM.
  #7  
Old 12-31-15, 07:23 PM
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If the tab was not broken between the two hots on a receptacle and the two hots are on opposite leg you would have a dead short. If the tab is broken you would have two 120 circuits.
 
  #8  
Old 01-02-16, 02:43 PM
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Neutral to Neutral, Hot to Hot, and Ground to Ground between two outlets on a single 110V 15 Amp power receptacle ... what would happen?
If you mean 2 outlets from different leg, you are shorting 2 hot and trip the breaker (hopefully).
If you mean 2 outlets from same leg, you get 120V, but incorrect wiring.

It will not exactly going to give you 30A, but circuit probably would not trip even if it goes over 15A and possibly causing fire since the circuit is not protected correctly.

This is not any different from DC.
 
  #9  
Old 01-02-16, 03:05 PM
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If you mean 2 outlets from different leg, you are shorting 2 hot and trip the breaker (hopefully).
That's not actually true, if the 2 hots were from different legs you would actually get 240 V and won't trip the breaker but it certainly an unsafe way to do it.
 
  #10  
Old 01-02-16, 05:26 PM
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The op said
I were to connect Neutral to Neutral, Hot to Hot, and Ground to Ground
Meaning he will put hot from 2 different legs together, thus shorting 240V.
 
  #11  
Old 01-02-16, 05:32 PM
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I was assuming he was pulling the power from the 2 different legs, not just tying them together which is an extremely stupid thing to do!
 
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