4 prong stove recepticle on 3 wire?

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  #1  
Old 12-30-15, 10:04 AM
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4 prong stove recepticle on 3 wire?

I am replacing the range in my kitchen with a free standing range. The old range was a electric cook top with a separate wall oven. The old oven and stovetop were connected to a breaker box behind the cabinet which was connected to a junction box near the floor. I removed the breaker and junction box and all wiring. Now all I have coming through the floor is the main wiring. There are 3 wires:red, black and white, no ground. Do I attach a 3 prong recepticle to this or does it have to be 4 prong? There is no ground wire. And get a 3 prong cord for my stove? Will it be grounded? Sometimes I would receive a slight shock from the old stovetop if I touched the sink at the same time. I was told that the stovetop was going bad. An electrician told me to put on a 4 prong recepticle and buy a 4 prong cord for my stove. I am concerned about the grounding. The house was built in 1979, Illinois. Thanks.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 10:17 AM
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Since you are redoing it you need to replace the cable. 6-3 NMb on a 50 amp breaker* would be a good choice since you are upgrading even if the stove will work on 40 amps. Be sure the neutral/ground bond on the stove is disconnected.

*If the manufacturer requires a 40 amp breaker use a 40 amp breaker but still use 6-3 so it can easily be upgraded if the next stove needs a 50 amp breaker.
 
  #3  
Old 12-30-15, 10:33 AM
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I know replacing the wiring would be best, but the wire runs through the ceiling joists of my finished basment. Was looking for an easier, but safe way. Also, on the main breaker box it has 50. Thanks.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 10:40 AM
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No way to bring it up to code without running new wire. Are ceiling joists perpendicular or parallel to the easiest path?

You could run buried cable outside to the kitchen and then run the cable through the cabinets to the stove.

If the existing cable is #6 you could run a ground wire through Wiremold across the ceiling of the basement. (You could run new 4 wire in Wiremold but the Wiremold would be larger and perhaps not as ascetic as smaller wire mod required by a single wire.)
 
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Old 12-30-15, 06:09 PM
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You are in Illinois, any chance you are near Chicago and your wiring is all in conduit?
 
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Old 12-30-15, 09:10 PM
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The ceiling joists are perpendicular. The house is a bi-level so burying the cable won't work. Will check into the Wiremold idea. Southern Illinois and no conduit. Got an electrician to come in. He put on a 4 prong recepticle with only the 3 wires, (no added ground wire) and told me to get a 4 prong plug when I buy the range.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 09:43 PM
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Got an electrician to come in. He put on a 4 prong recepticle with only the 3 wires, (no added ground wire) and told me to get a 4 prong plug when I buy the range.
If he did that he got his license from a box of Cracker Jacks. If you are not going to upgrade the wiring at the very least you need to use a 3 prong receptacle and a 3 prong plug.
 
  #8  
Old 12-31-15, 12:42 PM
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That could be considered an existing installation in which case art. 250-140 allows for that to remain a 3 wire circuit with the range cord a 3 wire and the neutral and ground boned to the frame,call that electrician back and have him change that receptacle,what a Hack!
One more important thing, what size is that cable?
 
  #9  
Old 12-31-15, 03:35 PM
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I will jump on the bandwagon and call the person that did the work a total hack. I wonder if they have ever seen let alone read a code book.
 
  #10  
Old 12-31-15, 07:23 PM
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Downstate Illinois is mostly rural and there isn't much regulation of those who practice the electrical profession there. Note I did not say electricians. My best guess is this guy was a coal mine electrician and has switched to residential work as the southern Illinois mines are pretty much all closed down. It was definitely wrong for this guy to install a 4-wire receptacle on a 3-wire circuit and then tell you to buy a 4-wire cord. That being said, if he did hook it up this way I sure hope he left the ground bonded to the neutral in the range connection box. To break that bond in this case would be a very serious safety/shock hazard and code violation. 3-wire receptacles and cords are readily available at any big box home improvenemnt store just for this reason, existing installations.
 
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