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Wire has no ground wire only white and black and GFCi tester shows open ground

Wire has no ground wire only white and black and GFCi tester shows open ground

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  #1  
Old 12-30-15, 09:05 PM
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Question Wire has no ground wire only white and black and GFCi tester shows open ground

My gfci tester shows open ground when I try to test gfci outlet (receptacle) ..is it because there is no ground wire in that romex? this is kinda old house and it has metal junction box but only white and black wire ..is this reason why gfci outlet shows 'open ground' ?

if so is there any solution without putting a new romex with ground wire?
 

Last edited by vikasintl; 12-30-15 at 09:27 PM.
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Old 12-30-15, 09:19 PM
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My gfci tester shows open ground ..is it because there is no ground wire in that romex?
Is this a receptacle with ground slot. Have you looked in the receptacle box.
if so is there any solution without putting a new romex with ground wire?
Install a receptacle without a ground slot or install a GFCI receptacle if you need a ground. The GFCI does not provide a ground but increases personal safety and is code compliant. If you really need a ground the only solutions are run a ground wire or run new cable. Usually running new cable is just as easy as running new cable if you are under older code that requires a ground run directly to the supplying panel. If you are under 2014 code it may be easier to run a just a ground wire because it can be run from the nearest circuit.
National Electrical Code 2014
Article 250 - Grounding and Bonding
VII. Methods of Equipment Grounding

250.130 Equipment Grounding Conductor Connections. Equipment grounding conductor connections at the source of separately derived systems shall be made in accordance with 250.30(A)(1). Equipment grounding conductor connections at service equipment shall be made as indicated in 250.130(A) or (B). For replacement of non–grounding-type receptacles with grounding-type receptacles and for branch-circuit extensions only in existing installations that do not have an equipment grounding conductor in the branch circuit, connections shall be permitted as indicated in 250.130(C).

(C) Nongrounding Receptacle Replacement or Branch Circuit Extensions. The equipment grounding conductor of a grounding-type receptacle or a branch-circuit extension shall be permitted to be connected to any of the following:
(1) Any accessible point on the grounding electrode system as described in 250.50
(2) Any accessible point on the grounding electrode conductor
(3) The equipment grounding terminal bar within the enclosure where the branch circuit for the receptacle or branch circuit originates
(4) To an equipment grounding conductor that is part of another branch circuit that originates from the enclosure where the branch circuit for the receptacle or branch circuit originates
(5) For grounded systems, the grounded service conductor within the service equipment enclosure.
(6) For ungrounded systems, the grounding terminal bar within the service equipment enclosure
 
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Old 12-30-15, 09:32 PM
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Thanks...How do I figure out if I am under older code or under 2014 code? I am trying to test gfic receptacle with gfci tester but romex wire which is attached to this gfci outlet has only two wires ..white and black..it does not have ground wire ...
When I push the test switch the outlet shows light and when I reset it goes away...so I thought this is enough and I have gfci protected outlet and circuit (this is the first outlet in circuit) but than I bought this gfci tester and it shows open ground so now am confused weather am protected against ground fault or not?
 
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Old 12-30-15, 09:35 PM
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My house was built in '56. I rewired almost all of it but there are a few circuits I left ungrounded (installed new receptacles without ground slot).

I figured most any device used in the area of those receptacles probably wouldn't be a 3-prong plug anyway.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 10:49 PM
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Accurate testing is best done with an analog multimeter (digital multimeter may give misleading readings). Those plugins can sometimes give false readings. Ground slot to wide slot should be ~0 volts. Ground slot to narrow slot should be ~120 volts.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 11:55 PM
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Well I checked with multimeter ...red probe in narrow and black in to wide shows 120v but black in ground and red in wide no volts but black in ground and red in narrow also show no volts ..what does that mean? I also checked ground to ground...i.e. black probe in roundish hole and red on metal part of outlet ...no voltage here either..so can u explain what does that mean?
 
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Old 12-31-15, 09:31 AM
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but black in ground and red in wide no volts but black in ground and red in narrow also show no volts
It means the circuit is ungrounded. (When measuring AC voltage probe color is irrelevant. They apply only to DC.)

Open the receptacle and check to see if there is a ground wire that is not connected. Next determine your wiring method. Is it metallic cable (Bx), non metallic cable (NM, Romex), or conduit. If it is not just a disconnected ground do you have a reason for it being grounded? If not you can use an easy fix to bring it up to code for an ungrounded receptacle.
 
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Old 12-31-15, 03:58 PM
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Since you already know that the circuit does not have a ground wire no tester is going to show that you do have a ground wire. It's also correct that you show 0 voltage between black and ground because basically you're just checking between the hot wire and nothing! Having the GFCI receptacle in the circuit helps increase personal protection but does not give you a ground. The only way to get a true ground in the circuit is to run a new feed to it.
 
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