Are there receptacles with ground inlet on opposite ends?

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  #1  
Old 01-02-16, 06:17 PM
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Are there receptacles with ground inlet on opposite ends?

I want to run a new dedicated 20Amp line to my washer and dryer - they are 10A and 6A respectively so I should be good to have them on a single 20Amp circuit.

Where I got stock is the actual receptacle.... I want to have a simple 20Amp duplex unit but can't find one that would allow for the plugs to be plugged in opposite direction.

As of now I wouldn't be able to plug in both the washer and the dryer as the plugs are just a bit too bulky....they will fit if run comes from the top and another from the bottom but all the receptacles I see only allow for plugs to come from one direction.

I can just use a short extension rated at 20amp....but don't want to do it....any other adapters or such ???

Thanks!

EDIT: Gas Dryer.....
 
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  #2  
Old 01-02-16, 07:10 PM
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Haven't seen a receptacle with angled orientation....good idea though.

I suggest using a double gang box with either two duplex or two single receptacles. That will give you plenty of room to plug both in. And since you are running a new line, hardly any extra work.
 
  #3  
Old 01-02-16, 07:24 PM
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2 single outlets in double gang might be safer...nobody else will try to plug in and overload the circuit..if I had two duplex receptacles....
 
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Old 01-02-16, 07:41 PM
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  #5  
Old 01-02-16, 07:46 PM
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Yes, but they should be GFCI protected, and while they make GFCI single outlets, they are not very common and are therefore more expensive. Alternative is to use a GFCI breaker for that circuit. Of course, they are more expensive too...

Good luck with your project!
 
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Old 01-02-16, 07:56 PM
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Or use a double gang box with a dead face GFCI on one side and the rotating duplex receptacle on the other.
 
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Old 01-02-16, 08:16 PM
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those rotating outlets are sure cool....but is it OK they are only 15Amps?
I am running 12AWG on 20Amp circuit..... and the only 2 appliances that I intend to plug in will draw a total of 16Amp.

As for the GFCI..... The sink is over 6ft away....do I still need GFCI due to the proximity of the washer ?

By the way...very similar question.....do I need a GFCI receptacle for my Sump pump?
This is kind of far from any sinks etc... dedicated 20Amp line terminated at the outlet 4 ft right above the sump pump.
The outlet was already there when I moved in so I believed it is up to the code (the house passed the inspection)
 
  #8  
Old 01-02-16, 08:37 PM
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You're right, if the edge of the sink is more than 6' away from the receptacle, you aren't required to have a GFCI...unless your washer is in an unfinished basement, bathroom, or kitchen.

But it's not a bad idea, safety-wise.

Ray...hadn't seen those rotating outlets; they are cool.

My understanding is that each receptacle in a (15amp) duplex receptacle is rated for 15 amps. The total draw is limited by the 20 amp branch circuit.
 
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Old 01-02-16, 09:19 PM
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It is code compliant to use a 15 amp receptacle on a 20 amp circuit if there are two places to plug in. A duplex receptacle has two places. 15 amp receptacles are what are normally use on 20 amp circuits.
 
  #10  
Old 01-03-16, 06:35 AM
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(for those eavesdropping)

Nothing forbids having a second duplex receptacle, also in the laundry area, on your dedicated laundry circuit.

Nothing forbids having additional receptacles in your laundry area on different branch circuits.

Unless you have an appliance that has a 20 amp plug (signifies that it draws more than 15 amps) you don't need 20 amp receptacles unless you plan to install just one round single receptacle on the 20 amp circuit.
 
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Old 01-03-16, 08:09 AM
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By the way...very similar question.....do I need a GFCI receptacle for my Sump pump?
By current code, yes, a sump pump is required to be on a GFCI protected receptacle.
 
  #12  
Old 01-03-16, 11:03 AM
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I guess I will ignore that silly code lest the GFCI receptacle trips when I am on vacation and I come back to a flooded basement.

Granted I do have a back up battery so I might be OK....still way too risky to have it trip
 
  #13  
Old 01-04-16, 09:10 AM
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It's more risky to get shocked sticking your hands in the sump when fiddling with the pump or walking into a flooded basement with a malfunctioning (and still live) pump. There are documented cases of people walking into the flooded basement, getting shocked, falling over and drowning in a couple inches of water. A backup pump, or alarm system is a better idea than leaving the circuit unprotected.
 
  #14  
Old 01-04-16, 01:52 PM
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I think this is exactly what the OP asked for and is at the big box stores: Name:  legrand.jpg
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Shop Legrand 125-Volt 15-Amp adorne White Square GFCI Electrical Outlet at Lowes.com

There also is the 4-plex from Hubbell but it still takes up the space of a double gang and is not GFCI or tamper resistant.
Name:  4-plex.jpg
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http://www.hubbell-wiring.com/press/pdfs/H4416R.pdf

Personally I like overkill for washer/gas dryer as some of the new ones draw more amps for heating water and steam. Use a 20 amp MWBC with two GFCI receptacles. Then you can plug in an iron as well and not worry.
 
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Old 01-04-16, 03:18 PM
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Another couple of cool products I haven't seen. Stuff like that is handy for problem situations. Thanks!
 
  #16  
Old 01-04-16, 05:23 PM
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ibpooks; Really want to understand that better.... How is that GFCI outlet will prevent electrocution if a pump is placed on a dedicated line ? I understand that GFCI detects and trips at a very small potential differentiation...(like 5mA) whereas the regular outlet would need more than 20Amps load to trip the breaker.
But in what scenario would the GFCI be superior over regular outlet...?
I am imagining that because this is dedicated line with only this one receptacle - if there was a short inside the pump, it would either blow the fuse or burn the motor.

Not questioning that GFCI might be better for safety....just want to understand how...
 
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Old 01-04-16, 06:18 PM
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if there was a short inside the pump, it would either blow the fuse or burn the motor
A GFCI does not detect shorts. It detects current leakage far too small to trip the breaker but great enough to injure or kill.
 
  #18  
Old 01-04-16, 09:10 PM
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But where is that current leaking from ? You can't find faulty ground anywhere in the line.... you have a brand new cable well secured along the entire run from the panel to the single outlet and only one device hooked up to that receptacle.... and since the entire pump is immersed in water inside the pit - that should either ground any current leaking....or simply trip the fuse....that's why I thought that any ground fault inside the pump would cause short.... being under water the entire system would be conductive.

PS: Not an electrician, as you probably guessed, but curious
 
  #19  
Old 01-05-16, 08:25 AM
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Your assumption that a fault in the pump (or cord) will trip the breaker is not true in many cases. Water is often not a good enough conductor to create the kind of short that would trip the breaker. It does however conduct well enough to deliver a fatal shock to a person touching the water. The pump or cord could even be leaking current into the water while the pump appears to be working normally. It can take a while for a water leak into the pump casing to cause enough corrosion and damage to actually seize it up or destroy it.

If you think of it in terms of scale, the breaker trips quickly at somewhere around 40,000 milliamps (2 times handle rating); whereas 5 milliamps is enough to cause disturbances to human heart rhythms -- that's somewhere around only 0.01% of the circuit capacity that needs to leak out into the water to potentially hurt someone.

The cable won't be new forever. The insulation can split or corrode on the cord, the water tight grommet can fail, the sealants eventually break down, there could be invisible defects like pinholes in the cord, or hairline cracks in the pump casing, etc...
 
  #20  
Old 01-09-16, 05:23 PM
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Thanks ibpooks - makes sense of course...but also prompts me to ask...why not require all outlets to be GFCI ? I mean, many of the failure modes could also happen in other rooms with other devices, like TVs, Receivers etc....

Sounds like it is not just about presence of water (which I understand is the only current condition that would require GFCI)....one could get electrocuted by touching metal case of a DVD player, receiver or computer....
What's your point of view on this.... ?

PS: I realize we are going into a deeper discussion now...not the original topic of this post.
 
  #21  
Old 01-10-16, 06:06 PM
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why not require all outlets to be GFCI ? I mean, many of the failure modes could also happen in other rooms with other devices, like TVs, Receivers etc....
The NEC is a minimum requirement and does not prohibit GFCI protecting all receptacles in your home. For maximum protection you could even use all dual function AFCI/GFCI circuit breakers. I believe all manufacturers are making them in response to requirements in the 2014 NEC.
 
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