Per code, which circuits need to be dedicated circuits?

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Old 01-04-16, 01:25 PM
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Question Per code, which circuits need to be dedicated circuits?

Per code, which circuits need to be dedicated circuits?
 
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Old 01-04-16, 01:33 PM
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Kitchen and dinning room receptacles, Bath receptacles, Laundry.

Kitchen and dining room: At least two dedicated 20 amp receptacle circuits. Can not share with lights.

Bathroom: At least one dedicated 20 amp receptacle circuit. Same circuit can be used in multiple baths. Can share with lights but only if it supplies just one bathroom.
 
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Old 01-04-16, 01:57 PM
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what about HVAC stuff?
 
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Old 01-04-16, 02:11 PM
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Welllll, yeah. I have a feeling you are planning on something. Can you fill us in on what you are doing, before we commit to rock hard answers?
 
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Old 01-04-16, 02:22 PM
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Mostly yes a central HVAC system needs to have dedicated circuits, however some types of similar or grouped air handling equipment can share.

Any equipment which the manufacturer specifies a dedicated circuit in the installation manual must have one per code.

A more general description is that most fixed-in-place appliances require dedicated circuits. Although to be very specific one needs to look at the minimum circuit ampacity and maximum overcurrent protection ratings on each appliance; combined with the code rule that any fixed appliance which uses more than 50% of a circuit capacity must have a dedicated circuit.

In a typical residence, dedicated circuits would be water heater, oven, range, cloths dryer, laundry washer, furnace/air-handler, air conditioner, built-in microwave, sump pump, well pump and/or sewage pump, most built-in heaters. Additional appliance which may or may not be dedicated due to circumstances would be garage door openers, garbage disposal, dishwasher, fridge / freezer. Items that are not in every residence, but should often require dedicated circuits would be shop tools like air compressor, table saw, welder.

As Ray mentioned there are also rooms which have specific circuit requirements and limitations.
 
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Old 02-14-16, 02:34 PM
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chandler,

a radon fan....
 
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Old 02-18-16, 09:58 AM
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A radon fan typically doesn't require it's own circuit as they are low-wattage devices.

Most locales require a weatherproof switch mounted outside next to the fan and outdoor rated fittings/wire (typically liquidtight conduit and THWN wiring) since the fan itself is required to be mounted on the exterior of the house.

Your local codes may have specific additions to this because it's an environmental safety device.

-Mike
 
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Old 02-18-16, 10:10 AM
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In addition to what Mike said.... some radon fans come with an attached power cord and just need a weatherproof GFI receptacle with an in-use cover.
 
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Old 02-18-16, 12:08 PM
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I know radon fan doesn't require a dedicated circuit.

The issue is what circuits can't it be added to?
 
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Old 02-18-16, 02:02 PM
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It can't be added to any bathroom circuit, kitchen/dining room circuit, garage door opener circuit. Basically any circuit that requires a dedication itself, cannot be added on to.
 
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Old 02-22-16, 12:05 PM
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It can't be added to any bathroom circuit, kitchen/dining room circuit, garage door opener circuit. Basically any circuit that requires a dedication itself, cannot be added on to.
Where are you getting that garage door openers are required to be on a dedicated circuit? Not the NEC.
 
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Old 02-22-16, 03:40 PM
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It's not code, and maybe "can't" was not the right word. Sometimes common sense has to take hold. Multiple GDO's together are rated rather high,with heavier door loads, and while they aren't usually operated in tandem, sometimes their amperage would behoove dedicating a circuit.
 
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