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Want to run a 220V outlet for an Air Compressor in garage.

Want to run a 220V outlet for an Air Compressor in garage.

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  #1  
Old 01-13-16, 02:36 AM
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Want to run a 220V outlet for an Air Compressor in garage.

Hi, new user. Have a couple questions. I got a quote for this and was asked for $800 in labor which I think is silly for a job that has to be a total cakewalk for an electrician. If I think I could do it myself in a half day, someone who does it for a living can probably do it in an hour or two.

So I think for now Im just going to run a simple 20 amp breaker to a 220v 6-20 NEMA outlet. CH makes a 3 wire plug for use with compressor rather than wiring them directly which I think is more appealing. A sub box would be nice but I might never use it. I do want to add a little more lighting but I think Im just going to swap out the current units with better, brighter LED units. Wouldnt require adding wiring to a sub panel. And I have tons of room left in my main breaker box anyway.

My biggest impediment here is distance. My box is outside next to the meter and about 40ish feet away from where I would need to bring it in through the wall where I want the outlet to be. Therefore I think Im going to use 10/3 UF-B instead of 12/3 just to be safe. Ill measure out a more exact distance when I get home in the morning.

Most of my questions are code related. If I get it inspected for insurance purposes I dont want to have to do it over on a dumb technicality. Im not overly concerned with the actual wire connection part in the box and outlet. That seems easy. More so placement of the wiring on the side of the house and location of the receptacle to please an inspector.

1. Biggest question. The UF-B is outdoor rated, and sun resistant. Do I have to use conduit with it if I run it above ground connected to an exterior wall. Being able to run just that heavy cable seems like it would make life way easier. Code I could find says "Conduit is required for protection from physical damage as necessary" Well who determines what is "As Necessary"? If its near the bottom of the wall it requires conduit but if its higher up it doesnt? Is it only required where it passes through the wall? IDK.

2. Outlet placement. Is it okay if its by my gas water heater? Does is have to be X amount away from a door? I think I read it needs to be at least 18" off the ground.

3. At the two point the cable will go through wall, does some sort of conduit need to be there or is it okay to go though a bare hole in the wall?

4. Wire Bends? Can I run straight down from the box and then make a 90* turn?

PVC conduit isnt expensive but seems to me it would add to the tasks complexity, and would be more conspicuous running down the side of my house. My preference would be to run the cable down near the ground but if it would be more code compliant I dont mind running it higher up. Some would suggest burying it Im sure but my AC unit is in the way of a direct line.

Thanks for any help.
 
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  #2  
Old 01-13-16, 04:48 AM
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Welcome to the forums! I am assuming the lighting for the garage starts at this same panel, which is not part of the garage. You can't run two circuits to the garage. You need to plan on running a 240 volt circuit to a subpanel in the garage and start from their with your lighting and other uses. You cannot run UFB above ground unprotected (hence the nomenclature "underground feeder), and it must be protected via conduit when it is above ground.

Let us know if you can put the subpanel in the garage and we can help you with the details of how to do it correctly.
 
  #3  
Old 01-13-16, 05:43 AM
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Okay. If you can't you can't. But why is it sunlight rated if it's only meant to be underground or in conduit?

As for the lights, not really all that germane to this project. There are already lights in the garage from original construction. I was thinking about massively expanding on them. But I think I'm just going to replace the existing units with better ones

So for now let's just stick to getting a 220 receptacle into the garage so I can have a real air compressor. Not a dinky 110.
 
  #4  
Old 01-13-16, 06:12 AM
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UF is fine above ground without conduit as long as not subject to physical damage. The determination is a subjective decision. There is no hard and fast.

If the garage is attached there is no limit to the number of circuit you can run to it. If detached it can only be one circuit or feeder.

Conduit will look nicer compared to cable strapped to the house. Cable can pass directly through the wall, no sleeve is needed but can be used if desired.
 
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Old 01-13-16, 09:58 AM
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So for now let's just stick to getting a 220 receptacle into the garage so I can have a real air compressor. Not a dinky 110.
That would be a 250 volt receptacle; your electric service is 120/240 volt single phase, not 110/220.

Therefore I think Im going to use 10/3 UF-B instead of 12/3 just to be safe.
You only need two insulated conductors and one ground conductor in the cable you use. You could use 12-2 UF-B cable, but it is acceptable to upsize to 10-2 UF-B cable if you wish. I would just run conduit and pull separate THHN/THWN conductors.
 
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Old 01-13-16, 10:23 AM
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Is this a detached garage? We can not help you unless we know.
 
  #7  
Old 01-13-16, 10:30 AM
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It's attached. I'll post some pictures shortly. I know it's technically not 110/220 but I just see it commonly referred to as such. Figured it was common parlance and everyone would basically know what I was getting at

I also when I was stumbling my way through code questions I saw something that said "You may see old construction with 2 two hots and a ground, but most new code construction requires a neutral"

I figured it would be just like going up a gauge to be safe. I could probably be dinged for not having a neutral but it wouldn't be bad to have one if I didn't need it.
 
  #8  
Old 01-13-16, 11:38 AM
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Alright not sure if this is going to work. Never used a forum that didnt have provisions for uploading photos.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bwb...ew?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bwb...ew?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bwb...ew?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bwb...ew?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bwb...ew?usp=sharing

Okay so a little more background. I just recently bought the house. Previous owners had a Spa. They took it with them. And just cut and capped the wires where they took it. Its an eyesore I planned on removing anyway. But it does give me a convenient hole already cut below the box I can use to run for this project. Ill just remove the 50 Amp breaker and put in a 20 amp

I took some blue tape and ran a rough projection from the box to where I would like to put the outlet. (Obviously on the interior of the garage) The X marks where I would go through the wall and have the outlet on the other side. Its about 65" away from the door and as you can see from the inside image it would sit just to the right of my water heater if that isnt a problem. I may have to remove part of that shelf. Only other concern, unless you guys raise some, is as pictured there is a water spigot near. So I need to figure out how to make sure I dont drill a hole through a pipe when I come through.

So thats 20" off the ground. Had to be that high to clear an obstruction off the back of my AC. Total length as measure from the middle of the box came in at 44'-6" Which sucks. I want to buy a 50' spool of cable. I was hoping it came in more like 38' to give me some more breathing room.

Thoughts?
 
  #9  
Old 01-13-16, 02:19 PM
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As long as you are more than 6'7" from the ground the cable generally doesn't need protection. You would need conduit to protect the vertical run to that height.

You may see old construction with 2 two hots and a ground
That applies to large appliances such as stoves that use 120/240. Once upon a time a combined neutral/ground was allowed but it hasn't been allowed for many years.
Never used a forum that didnt have provisions for uploading photos
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/li...rt-images.html
 

Last edited by ray2047; 01-13-16 at 07:43 PM.
  #10  
Old 01-13-16, 07:21 PM
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I know it's technically not 110/220 but I just see it commonly referred to as such. Figured it was common parlance and everyone would basically know what I was getting at
The only place I can think of where this terminology might be common would be around the table at a coffee shop where all those at the table are self proclaimed experts, but none of them really know what they are talking about.
 
  #11  
Old 01-14-16, 04:55 AM
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Pardon my assumptions that it was a detached garage. I was solely basing it on the amount of run you needed to accomplish the task. Being attached, you can run the circuits as needed as Jim pointed out. You won't have sunlight problems if it is attached and the runs are within walls. If you are running the circuit from the spa location (which wasn't mentioned), you may need protection of the cable from physical damage, which would lead to conduit. As mentioned your compressor will have no need for the neutral, but it could come in handy if the circuit were repurposed or broken up via subpanel for additional uses.

Are you planning on running the wiring on the exterior of the garage/house, or will you be burying it and bringing it back up at the garage?
 
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