Replacing electric heaters


  #1  
Old 01-15-16, 07:58 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Starkville, MS
Posts: 278
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Replacing electric heaters

I am intending to replace 2 bathroom heaters in our house built in 1957. It appears that they have not worked in a long time, we have been in the house for a year. In the crawlspace, the wires look fine and there is electricity to them. My question/ concern is if the wires are somehow compromised, am I increasing any danger by having a load on the wires. I assume the electricity has been live to the heaters since 1957.
 
  #2  
Old 01-15-16, 08:12 AM
P
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: port chester n y
Posts: 1,983
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Are these "flush" or surface-mounted heating-units ?
 
  #3  
Old 01-15-16, 09:17 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Starkville, MS
Posts: 278
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
They were and are going to be surface mounted. Almost the exact fit.
 
  #4  
Old 01-15-16, 09:34 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
In the crawlspace, the wires look fine and there is electricity to them.
Wires can't be used outside of a raceway. Do you mean cable? If you used a non contact tester to determine you have power that is not an adequate test. If cables what is the size marked? What will the amps of the replacement heaters be?
 
  #5  
Old 01-15-16, 12:19 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Starkville, MS
Posts: 278
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Sorry for the error, it is original cable. I had an electrician change out the panel from fuses to breakers and he informed me that the lines were live. He did turn off the breakers about a year ago to each heater. He said it all looked like #12. The new heater is 8.33 amps. I just didn't know if adding the load could be dangerous. Thank you for your help.
 
  #6  
Old 01-15-16, 01:27 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,985
Received 4,152 Upvotes on 3,729 Posts
You want to connect a heater to a dedicated cable. That shouldn't be any problem.

You do need to know if that is a 120v or 240v circuit there.
A 120v circuit would be utilize and single breaker while a 240v circuit would require a two pole breaker.

A heater using 8.33A could be a 120v 1000 watt heater. That on a single 20A circuit would be fine.
 
  #7  
Old 01-15-16, 01:59 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Starkville, MS
Posts: 278
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thank you for all the input. The question I am still just a little concerned about is if a live cable has a load added to it, is there additional danger. Since that cable was presumable live from 1957-2015, but who knows when the original load was ended (heater quit working), should there be any concern with adding a load back to it?
 
  #8  
Old 01-15-16, 02:03 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,985
Received 4,152 Upvotes on 3,729 Posts
should there be any concern with adding a load back to it?
Not at all. If the cable physically looks to be in good shape there should be no issues.
 
  #9  
Old 01-15-16, 02:18 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Starkville, MS
Posts: 278
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thank you, makes me feel better.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: