wiring load center

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  #1  
Old 01-18-16, 04:56 PM
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wiring load center

I'm new to this forum, so I hope I'm doing this post correctly! I'm working on wiring a 100 amp Eaton load center (16 circuit openings) for use in an out building that will house a vacuum pump and releaser (gathering sap from sugar bush). I'm running Aluminum 2-2-4 from the main entrance to this building about 375 feet away. The load center came with a pre-installed common bar and separate ground bar, & we have added a separate ground rod. My question is based on the fact that there is no main breaker or main lugs on the bus bar, so I think we need to wire directly in to 100 amp breaker that came with it and install that in positions # 1&3. Does this make sense? Also the 100 amp breaker came with a small screw through the middle of the two halves (double pole breaker) with a plastic piece on back of breaker to receive the screw. I couldn't see how this could be installed in the box, so I removed the screw before installing breaker. O.K.??

Thanks for any guidance.
 
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Old 01-18-16, 05:35 PM
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I'm running Aluminum 2-2-4
You can't use triplex. You must use quadplex (example: 2-2-4-6). An EGC is required for a subpanel.

The 100 amp breaker is intended as a main breaker. Does the label indicate the position to install it in?
Also the 100 amp breaker came with a small screw through the middle of the two halves (double pole breaker) with a plastic piece on back of breaker to receive the screw.
That is the code required hold down. It must be used. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...2Lzm0gzqlZhohA

What size breaker are you using at the main panel and what is your anticipated load?

Additional info: The bonding screw on the neutral bar must be removed. The EGC from the main panel, wire from the ground rod, and all branch circuit grounds must go to the ground bar.

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Last edited by ray2047; 01-18-16 at 05:52 PM.
  #3  
Old 01-18-16, 05:39 PM
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To add to what Ray posted, using #2 aluminum conductors the most you will be able to use at the shed will be about 30 amperes, either at 240 volts or balanced between two 120 volt circuits.

The screw through the circuit breaker is to hold the CB in place, it is not an option and must be used.
 
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Old 01-18-16, 06:24 PM
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Thank you both for your replies; we will be using a 50 amp breaker from main panel; the vacuum pump will be wired 240 and draws about 9 amps, the releaser is also going to be wired 240 and draws only about 3-4 amps, and we will only have a couple of lights beside that. We were going to use a double 30 for the pump and a double 15 for the releaser, and single 15 for the lights.

I believe the common bar and ground bar are separate already, but maybe that is not what you meant by removing the bonding screw on the neutral (common?) bar?

I believe that the 100 amp are supposed to be in #1 and #3 slots, upper left hand corner as you look at box, but I will double check on that.

Thanks again! brianT123

P.S. I will definitely put the screw back in and see how to install the 100 amp breaker correctly with that piece.
 
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Old 01-18-16, 06:29 PM
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But what about the cable? The one you specified is wrong.
 
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Old 01-18-16, 06:47 PM
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I can run the additional EGC wire, as I have not actually made the run yet. I will get 375 feet of #6 aluminum. Would I still leave the ground rod an #6 copper wire in place down at the out building?

So for understanding, the hold down screw kit is to hold the breaker in place, probably because you are feeding it with fairly heavy, stiff conductor?
 
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Old 01-18-16, 06:51 PM
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While Ray is absolutely correct in regard to the National Electrical Code, IF you have already purchased the cable you specified there is a slight chanced that your LOCAL inspector may give you special dispensation to use it PROVIDED there are no other metallic paths between the shed and the house.

You would have to ask permission from the local inspection agency and be prepared for them to say no. :NO NO NO:


So for understanding, the hold down screw kit is to hold the breaker in place, probably because you are feeding it with fairly heavy, stiff conductor?
It is required to be held in place because it is a "back fed" circuit breaker. The stiffness of the wiring is irrelevant.
 
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Old 01-18-16, 08:23 PM
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Would I still leave the ground rod an #6 copper wire in place down at the out building?
Apples to oranges.The wire from the house to the garage is your EGC (Equipment Grounding Conductor). The wire from the ground rod is your GEC (Ground Electrode Conductor). Both are required. Code allows you to run a separate wire. Are all three wires of the Triplex insulated? If all three aren't insulated it probably can't be used. Usually a feeder can not have a bare neutral and you can't add a neutral because unlike the ground code says it must be part of the cable.

the hold down screw kit is to hold the breaker in place, probably because you are feeding it with fairly heavy, stiff conductor?
No. If it pops out you have two bare live terminals floating around.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 01-18-16 at 11:42 PM.
  #9  
Old 01-19-16, 12:31 PM
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Yes, all three wires (2-2-4) are insulated; they are a braided three conductor set that has a yellow stripe on the neutral, with no outer sheathing. They are labeled URD, thus to my understanding can be direct burial. I was thinking that I would get the same type of conductor, just a single strand #6 for the ground as you recommended.

I'm hoping this would be a safe and acceptable route to take, as I have already purchased the original three conductor set for the needed length.

Thanks for all of your time with your reply(s) - very helpful.
 
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Old 01-19-16, 12:41 PM
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Yes it is as long as the wires are in the same trench underground and conduit when above ground.
 
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Old 01-19-16, 12:45 PM
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That should work though I'm not sure even for ground single conductor wire is rated for direct burial.
They are labeled URD
If that is the only rating on the wires it can not be brought into a building.
 
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Old 01-19-16, 12:56 PM
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Most electrical suppliers will stock single conductor USE-2 or URD. Big box stores maybe not, but it's worth checking.
 
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Old 01-19-16, 06:54 PM
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Yes, all three wires (2-2-4) are insulated; they are a braided three conductor set that has a yellow stripe on the neutral, with no outer sheathing. They are labeled URD, thus to my understanding can be direct burial.
A supply house will sell you what you ask for. You ask for URD and you get URD. If you bought the URD at a box store you should have been told that URD was not the right product for what you were trying to accomplish and a recommendation of the correct product should have been made.
 
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