Is it possible to add another panel for more circuits?

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-08-16, 12:15 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 40
Is it possible to add another panel for more circuits?

We are currently redoing our basement. We demo'd the basement over the weekend and were finally able to see how it was truly wired. It looks like the basement is all on 2 circuits for lights and outlets.

Is it possible to feed another panel from the main one with to accommodate more circuits?

I believe I have 150 amp main coming in that feeds the house and another garage. I'll get pictures of panel tonight.

Here is the floor plan we are remodeling to.

Name:  Basement floorplan (2).jpg
Views: 421
Size:  40.3 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-08-16, 12:34 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,356
Is it possible to feed another panel from the main one with to accommodate more circuits?
Not only possible but common. Read the following link.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-diagrams.html
 
  #3  
Old 02-08-16, 08:00 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 40
Here is a picture of my main panel. I have another panel in my detached garage that feeds from a 60 amp in here. (10&11)



 
  #4  
Old 02-08-16, 08:40 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,356
You actually have lots of room in that panel. Circuits breakers 5 through 12 and 17 through 24 can be replaced with "twin" units. That could give you as many as 16 new circuits. You may not want to change the 240 volt circuits, CBs 7/8, 10/11, 19/20 and 21/23 but that still leaves you 5, 6, 9, 12, 17, 18, 23, and 24 or enough for 8 new circuits. Being a Murray derivative panel you would use Cutler-Hammer type BR twin circuit breakers. I think they cost around $8-10 each.
 
  #5  
Old 02-09-16, 05:51 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 40
I would have room below or possibly next to this panel (Not much room next.
 
  #6  
Old 02-09-16, 10:07 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,212
Circuits breakers 5 through 12 and 17 through 24 can be replaced with "twin" units.
I believe the thin breakers of this vintage would be the Murray/Crouse-Hinds Type MH/MM breakers. Here are a couple for sale on E-Bay. Look closely and you can see the little hook that attaches over the bus stab.

Crouse Hinds 15 Amp 1 Pole MH115R MH mm Circuit Breaker | eBay

Murray Crouse Hinds MH20 1P 20 Amp Circuit Breaker New Right Side | eBay

These were sold as either a "Right" or a "Left".

As I remember, the bus stabs are also notched and will accept the Eaton/Cutler-Hammer BR Series Type BD CTL tandem breakers, like Furd mentioned.

Shop Eaton Type BR 15-Amp Tandem Circuit Breaker at Lowes.com
 
  #7  
Old 02-09-16, 11:54 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 40
Here are some more pictures of the area I have to work with. An electrcian at work says I should do a sub panel or a whole new panel.

Whats the best approach from a $ stand point? This area will be made into a small utility closet in our new floor plan.





 
  #8  
Old 02-09-16, 12:03 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,632
This area will be made into a small utility closet in our new floor plan.
NEC does no allow panels in closets. If your local inspector considers it a utility room it may be okay.

Using half breakers is simplest. You'd have to run the cost comparisons.
 
  #9  
Old 02-09-16, 12:11 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,288
NEC doesn't allow panels in storage closets, but a dedicated utility closet (no storage) would be OK if you can maintain the mandatory 30" x 36" clearance in front of the panel(s). The clearances can be measured with the closet door open.

You could potentially put the subpanel around the corner on the adjacent wall to the right of the pictured panel. I'm assuming that PVC pipe is the sump pump ejection pipe? You could move that to the left of the existing panel so that there are no foreign utilities in the electrical area.

BTW, NEC prohibits placing appliances (including mini fridge) in front of a panel.
 
  #10  
Old 02-09-16, 12:48 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 40
Good to know... The utility closet will only house the panel, no shelving or anything else is planned.

The pipe is for the radon system.
 
  #11  
Old 02-10-16, 10:56 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 40
My plan - add sub panel below - Any issues with that?

I think I could pull out #23 & 24 and use that to run to the new sub panel. What size breaker should I use? I was suggested to use a 60 amp breaker and run to a box that could hold 12 circuits.

Supply List (going to Menards):
sub panel - suggestions on what brand?
wire - ga? and length? 4' should be plenty correct?
tapcons - to mount box
box clamps

I should use this method, correct?
Name:  4-Main2Main-lug-sub_zps572be6cf.jpg
Views: 356
Size:  29.6 KB
 
  #12  
Old 02-10-16, 11:01 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,632
Yes, that is correct. .
 
  #13  
Old 02-11-16, 02:16 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,212
sub panel - suggestions on what brand?
I would buy a Eaton/Cutler-Hammer MLO panel. That way the new breakers you buy could be used in either panel.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'