EMT Conduit

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  #1  
Old 02-15-16, 05:43 PM
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EMT Conduit

So, I was at Home Depot today because I was shopping for connectors to connect EMT (metal) conduit to Liquidtight (for around the corner). I am running 12 gauge wires for external floodlight. The Home Depot representative told me that I can only connect Liquidtight from junction box to junction box, but there is no such connector from Liquidtight to direct EMT conduit. OK, no problem.


Then, the representative went on to tell me that it is against code to use EMT conduit outside the house and he recommends against it because EMT conduit will rust. I was confused when he said that it is against code when I remember my electrician ran conduit on the external walls a few years ago. I did not believe him so he took me to another Home Depot representative, and that second representative told me the same. Is this REALLY true???

I did ask them if it is against code, then what do people use to run wires externally? They could not reply and told me to check with the city. What a joke. I remember reading somewhere a while back that when running wires under ground, it has to be in EMT conduit and it has to be buried at least 18 inches. I am just really surprise the information they were giving out so I am trying to validate here.


AFC Cable Systems 1/2 in. x 25 ft. Non-Metallic Liquidtight Conduit-6002-22-00 - The Home Depot
 
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Old 02-15-16, 05:53 PM
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Did you ask him if you can't run it outside why do they make water tight fittings for running it outside? Not against code. You will find recommendations not to use for direct burial because it will rust out in a few years but that is a best practice not NEC as far as I know. Above ground it will last much longer because it is only occasionally wet. (Note: All code is local so we can't say what your local code is.)
 

Last edited by ray2047; 02-16-16 at 10:13 AM.
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Old 02-15-16, 05:58 PM
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That's the Big Box Stores for ya!
 
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Old 02-15-16, 06:01 PM
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Ray, thank you for the confirmation. Did they at least get this part right?

The Home Depot representative told me that I can only connect Liquidtight from junction box to junction box, but there is no such connector from Liquidtight to direct EMT conduit.


GeoChurchi, yep!
 
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Old 02-15-16, 06:03 PM
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Although there is no absolute prohibition on using EMT outside you must remember that ALL code is LOCAL. The national (model) codes have no power of enforcement and are only suggestions. However, when a local, regional or state legislative body enacts the model code into law the enabling legislation DOES give the code the power of law and will designate the enforcement procedure. Remember also that the legislative body has the power to add to or delete from the model code.

What this means is that the code you must follow, the LOCAL code, may be significantly different in certain areas than the model code. It is incumbent upon YOU to find out the differences and then follow the local code.

I have never heard of liquidtite conduit being prohibited in outdoor usage. EMT is NEVER (to my knowledge) acceptable for burial.

You need to call your LOCAL inspector and find out where you can view the local code. Some jurisdictions will have it on line, others will give you a copy and still others will refer you to a law books publisher. This last option is the worst in my opinion as the publishers always charge a huge price for what I think should be free or no more than the cost of printing.
 
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Old 02-15-16, 06:14 PM
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EMT is not allowed for direct burial in most cases, but is approved for wet locations when used with approved rain tight fittings.

To convert EMT to Liquid tight flex conduit I would use this fitting: 3/4" Zinc Plated Steel Short Threaded Coupling then use an EMT connector (Raintight) and a liquid tight connector.

For direct burial conduit I would recommend using electrical PVC.
 
  #7  
Old 02-15-16, 11:20 PM
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Furd, thanks for the info on National Codes vs Local Codes explanation.

Originally Posted by FURD
I have never heard of liquidtite conduit being prohibited in outdoor usage. EMT is NEVER (to my knowledge) acceptable for burial.
LiquidTite conduit was not in question for outdoor usage. It was more in regards to EMT conduit for outdoor usage; including wall mount.


Tolyn, thank you for the info about burying EMT. I will keep that in mind, and I won't bury EMT conduit anytime soon. I might have mistaken EMT conduit for
electrical PVC as you have already pointed out.

That threaded coupling is a fantastic idea!
 
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Old 02-16-16, 09:10 AM
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That threaded coupling is a fantastic idea!
The threaded coupling is frequently used, but not accepted by all jurisdictions. Technically, it is only UL Listed to join two lengths of rigid threaded conduit.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 01:02 PM
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You can use LB'S or pull ells to turn corners.

Those guys had a BS degree, but not Batchelor of Science.
 
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