Question on wiring dishwasher

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  #1  
Old 03-03-16, 06:02 PM
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Question on wiring dishwasher

Hello. I've got a quick question. I have a 15 amp (afci protected) dedicated circuit for my dishwasher. I have 14/2 running from the breaker box to a junction box. From there o run into the floor and up underneath the dishwasher which will be direct wired. My question is, I just realized I used 12/2 wire from the box under the floor and up to the dishwasher location instead of 14/2.

Is this an issue. I'm sure it's not a fire hazard since 12/2 can handle 15 amps. I'm just wondering if this will be against code and this fail my inspection.

Thanks!
 
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Old 03-03-16, 06:31 PM
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As long as the smallest wiring is protected at the proper ampacity the larger wire is not an issue.

Since you are hard wiring the DW you will need a breaker lock at the panel.

Under the 14 code the DW would also need gfi protection.
 
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Old 03-03-16, 06:53 PM
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Glad I asked...I had no idea about the lockout. I assume I could also add a switch under the sink too, but a lock is probably easiest.

How do I get the gfi protection. I am using a dual pole 15 amp siemens afci breaker (the house was build with 14/3 from the breaker panel to the kitchen, and then split at a box to the dishwasher and disposal). My understanding is that there are no dual pole afci and gfci breakers. I know there are single pole afci/gfci breakers, but that does not help me in my situation.
 
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Old 03-03-16, 07:10 PM
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(the house was build with 14/3 from the breaker panel to the kitchen,
What version of the NEC was in force when the house was built and wired? I would consider the circuit grandfathered, but if it becomes an issue and the inspector insists on GFCI protection too, I'd install a new circuit and use a dual function GFCI/AFCI breaker.
 
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Old 03-03-16, 07:18 PM
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If the dishwasher and disposal are both hardwired and there are no outlets then AFCI should not be required.
 
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Old 03-03-16, 07:22 PM
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The home was built on 1988. The inspector told me all afci for all kitchen circuits...the 2 20 amp small appliance runs, the microwave 20 amp, the 15 amp lights, and the disposal and dishwasher. I'll leave as is for now and see what he says, but I will add the lock. Sounds like I should also add a lock for the dedicated 30 wall oven which is direct wired as well.
 
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Old 03-03-16, 07:35 PM
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Did you mean GFCI's for the kitchen circuits ?

Sounds like I should also add a lock for the dedicated 30 wall oven which is direct wired as well.
Not required but good idea.
 
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Old 03-03-16, 07:38 PM
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No...I did mean afci as in arc fault. Why?
 
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Old 03-03-16, 07:48 PM
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If the dishwasher and disposal are both hardwired and there are no outlets then AFCI should not be required
The DW and GD both are outlets by NEC definition.
 
  #10  
Old 03-03-16, 08:16 PM
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I had no idea AFCI is required for kitchen outlets and GFCI is required for dishwasher. Apparently they were added to NEC 2014.
My county is still on NEC 2011.

You must be the county that is very quick to adapt new code.


Anyway, AFCI has no problem with electric igniter on gas stoves? I have heard of peopling having issue with that.

Unless you are pulling new wires from breaker panel, your inspector probably will accept it as grand fathered.


14 AWG to kitchen outlets seems too small even for 1988. My house was built in 83, and has 2, 20A circuits (12 AWG) in kitchen. But no GFCI.


Easiest way to add GFCI to your dishwasher probably is pulling wire under kitchen cabinet and put GFCI in junction box. It probably is cheaper too since GFCI breakers are expensive.
 
  #11  
Old 03-04-16, 07:41 AM
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Yes...I spoke with the inspector and that is the plan. And my 20 circuits have 12 gauge wire, not 14.
 
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