need some clarifications on NEC code

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Old 03-18-16, 07:53 PM
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need some clarifications on NEC code

Hey folks, my dad and I are re-wiring the numerous code violations in this house (orginally K&T but previous owners rewired and did a poor job).

So far we have found two circuit breakers over-rated for the gauge wire used (30A on 12ga, 60A on 1930s cloth 8ga yikes) and probably an entire violation of 334.15 (C)

All the wiring except for the lights and their respective switches are mostly under the house in a crawl space... some laying on the ground, most others supported, but they run joist to joist, with no running board.

Am I correct in assuming this is a violation of 334.15 and that everything save for the 6/3 Romex is required to be on a running board (including the newly wired dryer.. ugh. though that was emergency repairs)

Another thing I'm confused on is, are all the new outlets, regardless of height required to be tamper proof? We have no problem with this, just wondering before we get into the microwave circuit (which is shared on a 20A circuit driving step-mother insane). The current outlet for the microwave is about 4-4.5 feet of the off the ground and cant see that being needed to be TR.

Thanks guys.
 
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Old 03-18-16, 08:50 PM
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Some of this is going to depend on the code edition that is being used in your srea.

The #12 with a 30 amp breaker may be fine if it is a motor or compressor load.

For the smaller cables your options are bored holes or running boards.
 
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Old 03-18-16, 09:41 PM
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Regarding the TR receptacles...There are two exceptions that are pertinent to your microwave question.

Receptacles more than 5.5 feet off the floor are exempt.
Receptacles in a space dedicated for an appliance that is not easily moved are exempt.

The second one is a little vague. I would think it would apply to microwave if it was in a cabinet cubby and the outlet could not be reached with the microwave in place. But AHJ would have final say.

IIWM, I'd just use a TR receptacle....doesn't cost much more and then there's no question.
 
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Old 03-18-16, 10:54 PM
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(which is shared on a 20A circuit driving step-mother insane).
Not quite following you there.
 
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Old 03-19-16, 05:23 AM
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looks like its required for TR then on the microwave.

So from what you are telling me, the 6/3 is fine running from joist to joist as long as its supported every 4 feet or so, but everything else needs to run along the joist or is tacked to a running board, and pretty much every outlet is required to be TR, including GFCI.

Then why do they still sell non-TRs then...
 
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Old 03-19-16, 06:48 AM
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Tamper resistant receptacles are not required in many commercial/industrial settings.
 
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Old 03-19-16, 07:13 AM
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When the code changes the stores are allowed to sell the old stick until it is gone.
 
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Old 03-21-16, 08:40 AM
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TRs are only required in residential living spaces and some commercial buildings where children frequent like a daycare. Workshops, commercial, agriculture buildings, etc are all OK with non-TR.

The #6 cable is okay being "self-supported" every 4 feet. The smaller gauges need structural support from the framing.
 
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Old 03-21-16, 09:57 AM
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Then why do they still sell non-TRs then...
Some areas may not have adopted the latest codes or even could have amended the tamper resistant clause out of the code they adopted. There is still a huge market for non-TR receptacles.
 
 

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