Wiring a submersible pump monitoring light

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Old 04-09-16, 01:29 PM
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Wiring a submersible pump monitoring light

Hello all!

First post on the DIY forums, looking for some wiring help.

On our acreage we have 2 sump pumps in the basement and a submersible effluent pump in our septic tank. What I would like to do is wire these pumps up to some small lights that will flick on when the pumps run so that we can keep an eye on their function. These lights will be upstairs in the main living area, ideally just wired into a box in the wall. The advice I have been given by some people is that I will need to tap into the wiring for the float switch that triggers the pump to run, and that way whenever the float switch triggers on, the light will light up. I have a basic understanding of some wiring but I'm just not positive on the exact process to follow to accomplish my task.

To summarize, we have pumps that rely on a float switch to trigger them to run. I want a setup that will illuminate a small light upstairs whenever the pump is running.

Any advice? I appreciate any input at all. Thanks!
 
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Old 04-09-16, 01:34 PM
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I'm thinking a current transformer to trigger a solid state relay on a low voltage setup but that is beyond my knowledge.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 02:44 PM
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RIB relays make the perfect interface between high and low voltage. You'd use one relay for every circuit you'd want to monitor. Then with the aid of a low voltage source you could use any type of light you wanted upstairs. Preferably something low voltage to allow the use of low voltage cable.

You need to decide what you want for lights. It could be several LED'S in a single plate.
You'd need to let us know what control system your pump uses or supply us with pictures of it.

This is a RIB relay in a single box. You can have several in one box.

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Old 04-09-16, 03:11 PM
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You could use a current sensor switch around the pump cord, which will act as a switch for a remote light or LED. This way you don't have to alter the wiring of the pump or float switch. Here's an example:

http://www.dwyer-inst.com/Product/Pr...hes/SeriesMCS/

I've never used one, nor this type specifically, so you'll have to find one that works for your situation.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 04:44 PM
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Here's what I use: CR Magnetics CR2550-R Low Cost Remote Current Indicator with Red LED, 0.75 AAC Turn-On Point: Electronic Component Current Sensors: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

The current sensor (donut shaped thing) goes in the box containing the receptacle powering the pump. The black wire to the outlet is disconnected, passed through the current transformer, and then reconnected to the receptacle. If there's not room in the box, a second box can be added to contain the sensor. The LED attached to the current transformer will light when the pump is running. The wires to the LED can be cut and extended to any length desired. Hope this helps.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 08:26 PM
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Thanks for all the input everyone.

CarbideTipped, that is exactly the kind of thing I was looking for but could not seem to locate! Thanks a ton for that link. I'll be ordering a few of those.

As for extending the wire, what kind of wire would you recommend?
 
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Old 04-09-16, 08:43 PM
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It's low current and low voltage. Something like the class 2 cable used for low voltage LED in-wall wiring would work fine and could be run inside walls. 18 gauge would be plenty.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 11:12 PM
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Thermostat wire would be a good choice because you would have several wires in one cable to use. They do make direct burial thermostat cable or depending on cost you might want to take a chance on regular thermostat cable in conduit or consider sprinkler wire.
 
 

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