Commercial Toaster is 120V but has 220V cord/plug?

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  #1  
Old 04-13-16, 06:33 AM
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Commercial Toaster is 120V but has 220V cord/plug?

I bought a used Waring Heavy Duty Commercial Toaster (Model WTC800). The information sticker on the back says: 120V 60Hz 2200W.

So, the sticker says the unit is 120V. Stupid me, I got busy talking with the guy selling it and he plugged it in and it worked fine, so I bought it without paying attention to the plug.

Went to plug it in at our café today - and ZOINK, realized it's a 220V plug, and I only have standard outlets. I can't plug it in.

I went to a restaurant supply website and found that you can purchase this toaster for 120V or 240V.

My question is: Since the sticker says it is 120V, is the only thing that is different the cord? Are they all the same units, just different cords? And, can I simply purchase an adapter and use this in our café without any issue?

Maybe a simple question but rather be safe than sorry.
 
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Old 04-13-16, 07:28 AM
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Got a picture of the plug so the guys can see what your seeing?
 
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Old 04-13-16, 07:44 AM
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I suspect you have a 120 volt 20 amp plug since it's 2200 watts, which is too high for a common 15 amp plug. Here's a picture:

Name:  20 amp plug.jpg
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Notice one blade is turned 90 degrees to normal plug.

If that's what you have, it requires a dedicated 20 amp circuit with a matching receptacle. If you try to use it on a 15 amp circuit you'll just blow the breaker, and if you use on a 20 amp circuit with other equipment, it will also blow the breaker.

The 240 and 120 versions of the toaster would be wired differently internally; the difference is not just the cord.

Hope this helps!
 
  #4  
Old 04-13-16, 10:52 AM
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Hi CarbideTipped

You are correct - that's exactly like the plug the toaster has (one blade turned 90 degrees).

We do not have any 20 amp outlets here, and it would be a high cost for a $100 toaster to bring in an electrician for the job. I guess . . . we resell the toaster and get the right one.

Lesson learned.
 
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Old 04-13-16, 11:42 AM
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We do not have any 20 amp outlets here, and it would be a high cost for a $100 toaster to bring in an electrician for the job. I guess . . . we resell the toaster and get the right one.
The real issues is do you have any 20 amp circuits? If you have a 20 amp circuit all that is required is changing a receptacle. Being a commercial building I'd be suprised if any circuits at all were just 15 amps.
 
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Old 04-13-16, 12:00 PM
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Ok, I will find that out. Just to make sure that I understand: IF we find out that we have 20 amp circuits (It's a café in a hotel - so I am hoping that you are correct) - all we need to do is swap out the wall receptacle? Will it need to be a dedicated circuit? Because if so, that becomes tricky.

Lastly - and only related since you mentioned 20 Amp and swapping out receptacle. . . . We are looking at bringing in a dual espresso machine. The singles run on 120V .. but the dual need 220V. Would that be the same scenario: IF we had 20 Amp circuits, we could just swap out the receptacle and good to go? Or is that a whole different can of worms?
 
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Old 04-13-16, 12:04 PM
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Not the same scenario - your toaster is running on 120 volts but needs more current than can be provided on a 15 amp circuit. The espresso machine needs 240 volts, which is a whole different circuit.
 
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Old 04-13-16, 12:59 PM
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Thanks Stickshift . . . and everyone else for providing useful information.
 
  #9  
Old 04-14-16, 04:55 PM
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The toaster really needs a dedicated circuit. Considering the wattage of the toaster, I'd want to review the manual to be sure it can be run on a 20 amp circuit.

We are looking at bringing in a dual espresso machine. The singles run on 120V .. but the dual need 220V. Would that be the same scenario:
Being in a commercial building, I doubt you have 240 volts available. The first thing you need to do when considering new food service equipment is to determine what voltages you have available. I suspect you'll find the kitchen panel to be 120/208 volts, 3-phase 4-wire. A piece of 240 volt equipment might run on 208 volts, but performance could be affected. Consider a 240 volt toaster being run on a 208 volt circuit, it'll take a long time to make toast. This is why kitchen equipment manufacturers make equipment in both 240 and 208 volt depending on your needs.
 
  #10  
Old 04-15-16, 05:49 AM
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It is best if the toaster has its own circuit. But it will work on any 20 amp circuit with the proper receptacle provided you are disciplined to not use anything else (except perhaps a few lights)plugged in to that circuit while the toaster is running.
 
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