I have two 5-15p but only a 14-30r

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  #1  
Old 04-15-16, 09:27 AM
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I have two 5-15p but only a 14-30r

Folks,

I just replaced an old 220v dryer with a 110v model. The new one might turn out to be too wimpy, but it fits right where the old one was, unlike the 220v models I found. And the new one was really cheap and got great online reviews. So I want to try it. The old washer plugged right into the old dryer, actually. They were designed to be a pair for tight spaces.
So now I'm left with a 14-30 receptacle and two 5-15 plugs.
I'm out of the country for a year or so, so I can't re-wire anything until I'm around. For now, I'm renting the place out.

Short term: I'm thinking just get something like Conntek P1430611. Will that work for this job? Is there any way to get it for less than $76? That seems like a ton for a fancy 18" extension cord, but maybe that's just what it costs for a weird part like that.

Long term: If I decide the keep the 110v dryer, how hard is it to re-wire the receptacle to do what I want? How would that be done 100% properly?

Thanks for any advice!
 
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  #2  
Old 04-15-16, 09:59 AM
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The adapter you listed is not safe for use (and accordingly does not have UL listing) because there is no 20A fuse or breaker included. Whenever an adapter reduces the amperage of a circuit (in this case 30A to 20A), a breaker or fuse must be included. All the products from this brand look to be imports from Asia that do not meet North American safety regulations. If you look very closely at the description, only the cord is UL approved, the entire device is not.

If you do find a way to rewire it, change the breaker to a double-pole 20A, and replace the 14-30R receptacle with two 20A GFCI receptacles (one on each hot, neutral and ground are shared). This should be a quick and easy conversion.
 
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Old 04-15-16, 10:24 AM
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Tech note: Nominal voltages are 120 and 240 not 110 and 220. The old dryer was 120/240 or 240 not 220.

If you can't do the rewiring to do this safely because you can't be there time to call an electrician. This will be easy for a qualified electrician to do.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 04-15-16 at 11:03 AM.
  #4  
Old 04-15-16, 11:00 AM
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The old dryer was 120/240 not 220 or 240.
Without knowing the manufacturer of the original washer/dryer combination unit you cannot know for a fact that it was 240/120 volts. My washer and dryer, stacking individual units ARE straight 240 volt machines. Mine are made by Asko, a Swedish company. Straight 240 volts is common for European machines.
 
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Old 04-15-16, 11:05 AM
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Thanks for the reminder Furd. I have corrected my post. It seems the old one may have been a 240v stacked laundry unit.
 
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Old 04-15-16, 11:21 AM
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Bosch and Miele (both made in Germany) also have straight 240 volt washing machines and dryers.
 
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Old 04-15-16, 11:57 AM
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Awesome, thanks for the help!

So it sounds like the long term solution is to rewire the 14-30r into 2x5-20r using the existing wiring - one hot lead per new receptacle, with neutral and ground shared. Replace 30 amp dipole breaker with 20 dipole.

Question: does anyone know of a thing like the Chinese adapter I mentioned earlier which is UL listed to use as a temporary solution? I suppose it might exist but not be worth the price, since it sounds like calling an electrician wouldn't be that expensive even if I have to call again to undo it in six months.
 
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Old 04-15-16, 01:41 PM
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Yes I've seen them sold as generator break-out boxes for construction sites and theater purposes. I have not seen them less than a couple hundred dollars though.

Unless there is some crazy circumstance we don't know about, an electrician can probably do this as a standard service call.
 
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