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Can the neutral wire tied to the ground make 220V two phase?

Can the neutral wire tied to the ground make 220V two phase?


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Old 05-29-16, 09:19 AM
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Can the neutral wire tied to the ground make 220V two phase?

Hello,

I live in the US, and I want to install a conveyor dyer that requires 220V single phase and 50 amp. I took some classes on electricity 10 years ago, and little did I do with that knowledge. Now, as far as I know, 220V single phase requires 2 hot wires and 1 ground. 220V two phase, on the other hand, need the two hot wires and the neutral one.

I check my circuit panel today, and I noticed that the neutral in tied to the ground; therefore, if I connect the two hot wire and the ground to the circuit panel, does it not make it two phase since the ground and neutral are tied together? I know two phase is no longer in used, but maybe I am wrong.

Any suggestion will be highly appreciated,
 
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Old 05-29-16, 09:59 AM
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Two phase power is not used in the US. I think what you are trying to describ eis the difference between a 240 volt only and a 120/240 circuit. The 240 is 2 hots and a ground. 120/240 is 2 hots, a neutral and a ground.
 
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Old 05-29-16, 11:21 AM
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A dryer never uses 2 hot wires and a bare ground, or at least not any dryer I have ever seen.

There are two ways to wire a dryer, 3-wire and 4-wire. The 4-wire is now required, the 3-wire is sometimes grandfathered.

The 3-wire uses the insulated neutral, with the neutral bonded to the chassis with a strip from the terminal block.

The 4-wire uses the neutral and the ground. The neutral is connected to the block and the bonding strip is removed. The ground is connected directly to the chassis.
 
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Old 05-29-16, 02:43 PM
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http://bbcind.com/wp-content/uploads...10/AIR2408.pdf

provided is the link of the conveyor dryer I am talking about. In the circuit panel of the conveyor, there are two breakers and a ground screw. Now, in the main circuit panel of the house, the ground and the neutral (green and white wire) are connected in the same bar; will this (green and white wire are connected in the same bar) affect/damage anything in the dryer? or should I create another ground exclusive for the conveyor?
 
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Old 05-29-16, 04:02 PM
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My comments referred to a clothes dryer, please disregard.
 
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Old 05-29-16, 04:17 PM
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In the US, most residential electricity is wired split phase. It still is a single phase. Not 2 phase.
2 phase is no longer used and as far as I know no one uses 2 phase in the world. 2 phase will have 4 conductors (2 for each phase excluding ground) and no neutral.

As you found out already, Neutral and Ground is tied together at the main circuit breaker panel. Neutral is a center tap from the transformer, thus splitting a single phase 240V into 2 120V circuits.
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From what I see in the specification, your dryer does not use 120V at all and will not require neutral. Just connect 2 hot wires from 2 pole breaker to the dryer and a ground.

You do not need to run another ground. If fact, it can be dangerous if that ground is not tied at the breaker panel as a ground fault will not trip the breaker in this case.

You will need 50A 2 pole breaker and 6 AWG wire for your dryer and a outlet matching your dryer cord (unless it is hardwired).
 
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Last edited by lambition; 05-29-16 at 04:47 PM.
  #7  
Old 05-30-16, 12:36 AM
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Thank you guys so much for the info. It did help a lot. Enjoy the Memorial Day Holiday!
 
 

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