Generator for TIG/MIG or add 240V outlet in garage?


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Old 07-29-16, 12:09 PM
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Generator for TIG/MIG or add 240V outlet in garage?

Hi guys,

I'm going to be working on my project car and I need a 240V outlet for my Miller Multimatic 200 (a really cool machine if you need a welder btw). I'm trying to figure out which is going to be cheaper:

Do I buy a generator to run the welder, specifically for TIG?
Do I run a new line to my garage (This comes with a list of problems in itself)?
Can I convert an existing 110V to 240?

I'm guessing that list is from most expensive to least. Second round of questions is:

If I do the generator route, what should I look into? When I type in "generators for TIG welding" and variants of that, it doesn't come up with alot in Google.
If I run the new line, should I get a professional to come out and look at everything or do I need a permit of some sort? My house isn't even in a HOA and I'm in Georgia so the rules are pretty lax.
If I convert an outlet, is that going to affect the other outlets in my garage? I believe they're all on the same breaker.

One other possibility is I can run an extension cord, but it would have to be around 100' and I don't think they sell those.

Any other ideas I'm more than open to trying.

Thanks so much,
Mitch
 
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Old 07-29-16, 12:24 PM
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Hi Mitch,

With that Miller machine you can run it on either 120V or 240V although you do lose some capacity with the 120V option. If you have a 120V 20A circuit the machine will be able to get most of its capacity.

If you have a 20A circuit in your house you could run a heavy duty 10 gauge extension cord. You should be able to get a 100' length in a professional contractor cord.

Best option would be to bring 240V service from your house panel to your garage, but as you guessed that is probably the most expensive option. Permits are usually required, although sometimes not in rural or agricultural areas. Most areas allow homeowners to pull the permit and do the work without an electrician, or a contractor could do it all.

If you want to give us a sense of the layout of the two buildings and of the house main service we may have some ideas on how to make this happen more easily.

Welder manual for reference:
https://www.millerwelds.com/~/media/.../d/dc12-57.pdf
 
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Old 07-29-16, 12:26 PM
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A detached garage can only have one power supply. If you don't already have a subpanel the existing power supply will need to be abandoned and a subpanel installed. As expensive as it sounds that will still probably be cheaper then a generator. Given the low amperage of the welder you can probably get by with a 40 or even 30 amp feed to a subpanel. I'd suggest going for 40 amp. You can either do that with 8-3 UF direct burial cable or four THWN individual wires in conduit (two #8 black, one #8 white and one #10 green). A 60 amp main lug panel could be used for your subpanel. Will give you the full details if you are interested.

Assumes a detached garage since you said 100 feet. If attached it gets a lot easier.

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http://store.cyberweld.com/mimu200au...jWYaAtJ38P8HAQ

OOOPs Ibpooks beat me to answering.
 
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Old 07-29-16, 12:58 PM
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Hi guys,

Thanks for the quick responses!

ray2047:
The garage is attached but I think it was attached after the original house was built. We just moved in and I'm not home right now so I can't go look, but the panel and sub panel are both in my under-ground basement right next to the 240 outlet for the dryer. I do know the basement wall ends where the wall of the garage begins. I don't think I can thread a cable out to the garage just with the way it looks, at least not without drilling through the basement's cinder block and/or the floor of my kitchen upstairs. I'm no electrician though...

ibpooks:
I'm assuming with a multi-meter I can check if I have a 20A wall outlet? From what I've read though, TIG welding with the Multimatic requires 240 to work properly.

If it helps, I can take pictures and upload them (if the website allows it). If not, I can upload them to a image site, again if the admins allow that sort of thing.
 
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Old 07-29-16, 01:02 PM
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http://www.doityourself.com/forum/li...rt-images.html

You may be able to plug an extension cord into the dryer receptacle using an adapter if it is 4-wire.

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Technically a 3-wire will work but it does not have the needed ground and would be less safe.
 
 

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