wiring electric

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  #1  
Old 04-19-01, 07:22 PM
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i need to add an electric outlet outside as to plug in landscrape lights. i know how to run the wire down into the wall but my question is, how do i hook it up into my electric box? i do know that i have to change one of my circuit breakers from one 20 amp. to two 20 amps. at least i think that how i do it! if this is correct ten all i need to do i guess is run my wire over into the main and hook it up into the new circuit breaker. does any of this sound right? hope to hear from someone for some help. thanks greek
 
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Old 04-19-01, 08:52 PM
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greek,

Adding a circuit to the breaker box is one of the most sophisticated operations a do-it-yourselfer can do. It will bring you closer to death than any other thing you'll ever do to your electrical system. There is no way to completely deaden your panel without the help of the power company. You'll be working in close proximity to live 240 volt power that has massive amperage capacity and is not protected by a breaker (i.e., it won't shut off as it's electrocuting you).

I say all of the above because my writing ability is not clear enough to tell you how to do this operation safely in this forum.

Please visit your local public library and your local home improvement store. See if you can find a book that will tell you in great detail, along with good pictures, how to do this. Be aware that most basic wiring books do not go this far, so you may need to find a more advanced wiring book. Do not blindly take the advice of some random employee in the aisle of the home improvement store.

Keep in mind that this outside outlet will need GFCI protection, preferrably from a GFCI outlet inside the house (so that the whole length of wire to the outlet is protected).

I assume that you are considering a twin breaker because your breaker box is full? Is this correct?

I also assume that you know you need 12-gauge wire for this circuit, and that there are special considerations if any length of this wire will be outside (you didn't say one way or the other).

There are also codes for securing and protecting this wire, and for cable clamps as it enters the panel.

Study hard before you begin. Your life depends on it.
 
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Old 04-20-01, 11:43 AM
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No way to deaden the panel UNLESS you have a main service disconnect upstream from that panel. (Between the panel and the meter.) If not I would listen to John. Electricians know exactly what they can and can't touch inside that panel, and will rarely call the utility for a cut-off to add a circuit breaker. However, many people incorrectly believe that killing the main breaker is an absolute guaranty that they are working in a safe, de-energized situation. And many of them will be working away, inches from a severe shock or death, and just happen to not touch anything and finish without incedent. Luck is not an approved safety method when working around electricity. Please be careful.

Juice
 
  #4  
Old 04-22-01, 06:46 PM
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electric box

o.k. i have 12 gauge wire that i am going to use. what i am planning on doing is this, put me an outside outlet box and gfi switch on the outside of my house, then run the 12 guage wire up thru the wall and over into the attic then down into my main circuit box. what i have now is a 200 amp. circuit box, i have about 4or 5 circuit breakers that are marked 20 amp. i think i can, correct me if i'm wrong change 1 of the circuit breakers from 1 20 amp into two 20 amp. please help me if i am wrong! if i am right, i fell i can bring my wire down into my main circuit breaker and hook it up. if i follow the way the rest of the wires are split then i think i can do this. all the help i can get is appreciated.
 
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Old 04-23-01, 08:06 AM
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Yes, greek, that is correct assuming your current box is completely full. If you have a spare spot, it would be better to use that instead of doubling up.

Hook this new breaker up as you see the others hooked up. Of course shut off your main breaker and don't touch anything you don't have to (as we have warned, there is still deadly and exposed power in this box). Make sure you tighten the connections down very tightly, and route the wires neatly (keeping them towards the outside of the box). Connect the neutral to an unused hole on the neutral bar, and the bare wire to the grounding bar. Clamp the cable as it enters the box, and staple it outside the box if you can. Be very careful removing and replacing the panel cover, since you don't want to bump it into live conductors.

Use a waterproof box for your outside receptacle. Staple the cable where you can.

Post back when you're done so we know you're still alive.
 
  #6  
Old 04-24-01, 10:12 AM
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Note: If this is your main panel, and there is no disconnect upstream (between this panel and the electric meter), then your grounds and neutrals will ordinarily both be connected to the same bus bar, which is probably what you will see. This is normal and OK to do.

Juice
 
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