Laundry room code requirements

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Old 09-08-16, 08:30 AM
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Laundry room code requirements

So, the previous owner converted an area on the side of my kitchen into a laundry room, but did a poor job of plumbing and wiring it, so I'm redoing it. The "room" is two side walls about 30" wide each, a back wall 60" long, and two bifold doors (total 60") that match the cabinetry in the rest of the kitchen for the front. So, is this even considered a separate room? I mean, I could just take down the doors and it would be open to the kitchen...

Anyways, what is the current requirements for wiring this "laundry room"? I will have an electric dryer (current breaker is 2x50!, new dryer has a 30a cord) and a washer (dryer will be stacked on washer.) How many receptacles will I need minimum - just those two (220 for dryer, 110 for washer)? Are any others required? Does the room require a dedicated circuit for 110? Does the washer have to be on its own circuit? If I put a light in there (none now) does it share the washer circuit or does it share a circuit with general house lighting? If I put in another 110 receptacle, does it share the circuit with the washer, with some other part of the house, or does it also have to be a dedicated circuit?

Florida uses 2011 NEC, but newer requirements are fine too.
 
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Old 09-08-16, 08:41 AM
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For the laundry area (doesn't specifically say room), you need at least one 20A circuit with a GFCI receptacle for connection of laundry equipment (washer and/or gas dryer). The electric dryer should have a four-wire 30A circuit using a double pole 30A breaker and 10-3/g cable with a 14-30R receptacle. If the dryer has a three-wire cord/plug on it, you'll need to swap that out for a four-wire cord set (prefab from hardware store) and connect it according to manufacturer manual. This process will involve removing a bonding strap, screw, or wire inside the wiring compartment of the dryer. The lighting should be from any other general lighting circuit, not the same circuit as laundry, bath or kitchen receptacles.
 
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Old 09-08-16, 09:01 AM
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Thanks for the quick reply.

The old setup was 2 hot 1 neutral 1 ground NM cable that went to a junction box in garage, then just the 2 hots and 1 neutral over to the outlet box behind the old dryer, but through a MC cable in wall. It had a 3 prong outlet and my new dryer came with a 3 prong cord that matched (they included it, installed into the dryer, I didn't specify or request it.) So, if I get a new 10-3/g cable to run from junction to receptacle (in the wall of course), it doesn't have to be MC, NM is fine? The NM cable from the breaker box to the junction box is much bigger than 10 gauge btw. So I'll just swap out 2x50 for 2x30 in the breaker box, right?

Now, if I want to add a second outlet in the room (to plug in other stuff) or add a light to the room, can either of those share my new 20a washer circuit?

(Hey, while I got you on the line, what gauge cable do you use for an electric water heater? I need to check and see if my current setup is correct.)
 
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Old 09-08-16, 12:23 PM
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NM is okay, assuming it's protected in a standard framed and drywalled wall. If the existing cable is aluminum you can't join it directly to new copper without special connectors. It would probably be better to replace it than to make a copper to aluminum connection.

You can add a second receptacle to the laundry circuit in the laundry area, but not a light.

A standard 40gal water heater uses a double-pole 30A breaker with #10-2/g cable (2 hots + ground, no neutral).
 
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Old 09-10-16, 12:23 PM
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NM is okay, assuming it's protected in a standard framed and drywalled wall.
Yes, this meets the NEC requirements, but the OP is in Florida. I am not familiar with Florida requirements, but I do remember quite a few threads about homes in Florida where the wiring was all in conduit. Is conduit, or MC cable, a Florida requirement? Only the AHJ can answer that.
 
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Old 09-10-16, 03:44 PM
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There is one member in Miami. If I recall correctly most of the conduit in Florida threads were his.
 
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Old 09-11-16, 03:21 AM
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Backing up 25+ yrs I painted a lot of new construction houses in central fla and never saw any cable covered by drywall in conduit - only the exposed wiring got conduit.
 
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