220v Bandsaw to 220v LED Strip

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Old 09-20-16, 12:23 PM
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Question 220v Bandsaw to 220v LED Strip

Per this thread almost a year ago, I hooked up a 220v indicator light to the back of my bandsaw. The problem is that it's not bright enough to be noticeable. This is certainly my fault since I mounted it on the back of the bandsaw (thinking it would illuminate the garage door)

So, I noticed a 220V LED Strip. I'm thinking of hooking 1 meter of this up to the side or front.

I'm very familiar with 5v & 12v DC LED strips, but not AC strips. Here's the link to the strip I'm considering (1m, Red). My assumption is that there's a transformer in that white bubble.

What would be a safe way to hook this up to the bandsaw? I'm referring more to the physical running of wires rather than the electrical schematics. My objective is to minimize the risk of electrical shock and/or fire, since this will be in a wood shop.

If you have any particular advice, I would appreciate it.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 01:09 PM
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Are you in the US. That LED strip you linked to has a European style 220V plug on it. I'm not sure it will work because European electric is 50Hz. Just make sure before you purchase it. Also US voltage is 120/240, 220 has been long gone in the US.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 01:25 PM
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Members IP definitely indicates U.S so probably just confused about his voltage. Keith, the plug on that light is definitely not for U.S. use. Best would be to use a relay with a 240 volt coil to control a standard 120 volt light.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 03:04 PM
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Ok, yes, US. I did not think about frequency.

My shop equipment says 220v (or 230v or 240v) depending on the tool. That's by connecting both prongs to 120v legs. So for other countries, is their 220v on one leg?
 
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Old 09-20-16, 03:31 PM
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Or rather, what's the difference between my current 220v LED indicator light, and this 220v LED strip?
 
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Old 09-20-16, 04:30 PM
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Ad copy and descriptions are often written by people with little knowledge of electrical. So things like 220 in adds to some extent can be ignored. When we talk of voltage here we talk of nominal voltage delivered by the power company. On single phase residential that is 240 volts (10%).
That's by connecting both prongs to 120v legs.
No. Your house is supplied with 240 volts. The legs going to the saw are the two legs of the 240 volts to your house. The 120v used in your house is derived from one leg of the 240v and a center tap (AKA neutral) on the secondary of the supplying transformer.

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So for other countries, is their 220v on one leg?
No they have just two 220 volt legs but no third wire from a center tap to provide 120 volts. They do have a "neutral" that is a grounded conductor but it is one of the 220 legs.
what's the difference between my current 220v LED
The strip you linked to you wanted to use had a non U.S plug. With the one you already have the nature of the ad seems to indicate it is for U.S. market and the 220v is just ignorance. It's admittedly just reading between the lines sometimes and nothing specific. You get a feel for it.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 09-20-16 at 05:06 PM.
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Old 09-20-16, 06:27 PM
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Linked LED strip will not care about the frequency. It is just series of LEDs with resistor.
But the voltage can be a issue. If you are in a residential house in the US, chances are you have 240V not 220V. Since resistors in the strip was selected for 220V, it may burn out by over driving LED.

Why note use DC LED strip with a power supply that can take 240V? Most switching power supplies do even if it comes with 120V plug on it. Check specification.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 06:46 PM
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I've pondered this, and would much prefer to convert to DC.

I do have 100-240v AC --> 12v DC wall warts on hand that are rated for the current I would be using. Something seems odd about hooking this up - like do take an extension cord, run it inside the saw's jbox, tape it bright pink and mark that it's for super-low-current 240v AC only, and then plug the switching adapter into it? It seems a bit redneck, but I do live in Missouri.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 06:56 PM
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With the one you already have the nature of the ad seems to indicate it is for U.S. market and the 220v is just ignorance.
The one I have now is indeed a 220v/240v indicator lamp. When I received it, I ensured it said that on the case even. It's an indicator light for power tools, many of which, in my garage at least, run on 240v. Per the other thread linked in the original post, significant effort went into finding the wires that would provide 240v switched at the appropriate times.

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