New kitchen wiring questions

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  #41  
Old 10-09-16, 07:20 AM
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Thanks for the advice - I have an under cabinet light plan now!

Another issue cropped up: SABC receptacles that go in the tiled wile above the counter. The boxes I have, use an integral bracket that sets them 1/2" out from the stud face for the drywall (as is standard). Do you do anything to bump them out another 1/4" or so to make up for the tile thickness going over the drywall?
 
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  #42  
Old 10-09-16, 08:18 AM
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Just install box extenders when you install the devices on the finish. Otherwise using adjustable boxes are an easy way to go but will require you to change out the boxes.

Examples:
1-Gang 21 cu. in. Non-Metallic Wall Box with Adjustable Bracket-B121ADJ-40R - The Home Depot

2-Gang 34 cu. in. Adjustable Electrical Box with Side Clamp-B234ADJC - The Home Depot

Arlington | FA101 Product Information
 
  #43  
Old 10-09-16, 08:24 AM
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I wouldn't bother with trying to make the boxes flush with the tile. 1/4" back is fine, just grout any gaps between the box edges and the tile. You probably won't even need longer screws to secure the devices.
 
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Old 11-07-16, 10:42 AM
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Connecting SABC outlets:

My SABC's are daisy chained. Can I use the terminals on each receptacle to connect the feed cable to the outgoing cable or do I need to wire nut them and use pigtails to each receptavle? DOes it matter if they are GFCI receptacles?

Thanks guys.
 
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Old 11-07-16, 10:58 AM
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So long as the first receptacle is GFCI and the rest are fed from the load side of the GFCI the other receptacles should be regular receptacles. Pigtailing on the regular receptacles is considered slightly more reliable. You can't pigtail the GFCI receptacle because you need to connect to the load side.
 
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Old 11-07-16, 11:57 AM
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I understand about the GFCI being first, but what do you mean about "more reliable?"
 
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Old 11-07-16, 01:58 PM
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A pigtail is more reliable when daisy chaining receptacles.
Continuing a circuit downstream using the receptacle terminals is fine and will work, however if that receptacle breaks or is removed, power will cease to flow downstream.
 
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