Remounting electrical panel

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Old 10-09-16, 05:58 PM
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Remounting electrical panel

As I work across my basement framing project, I'm almost ready to start on the exterior wall where my Electrical Panel is. This is the same wall that also has my main drain line running along a portion of the wall.

So in preparing to build that wall, I intended to build the wall in front of the main drain, about 3 or 4 inches off the wall. But when I do that, I would prefer to also then remount the electrical box to be flush with the new wall.

Currently the box is attached to a small sheet of plywood, and that plywood is mounted to what looks like 1x2's attached to the concrete wall.

Is there any issues to be concerned about in pulling the box about 2 inches further away from the cement wall so it is flush with the planned new framing? From what I tell, I shouldn't have to mess with any existing wiring as there is enough slack in the wires to pull it out that much.

Does the panel need to attached to plywood behind it, or when remounting can I mount it to 2x4 studs on each side of the box? I'm fine doing either one or both. Just trying to confirm if should be aware of any other unexpected issues.

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Old 10-09-16, 06:31 PM
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Usually the problem is the feed from the electric meter, which often is run in conduit and may enter from the back of the panel. Is your feed not in conduit?

A secondary concern is that the box will likely end up a little higher as you take up a little slack moving it out. But they are rarely set so high the moving it up an inch or two is an issue.

You can certainly mount it to studs through the sides; just keep in mind that doing so will prevent any cables entering from the sides in the future. OTOH, you will have room to run cables behind the box and enter from the bottom should you need to do so down the road to add additional circuits.

Do you have an upstream disconnect, or will you have to have the meter pulled while you move the box? Personally, I wouldn't try to move a live box, even with the main breaker shut off.
 
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Old 10-09-16, 07:36 PM
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Home was built in the mid 90's and there's no conduit from what I can see. Just what appears to be the main line from outside the home entering into the box. If there is an upstream shut off I don't see one, but could that possibly be located outside the home? Its late/dark here and I can check that tomorrow morning.

And yes, currently there is nothing entering the box from the sides, and with its current mounting on 1x2s' and plywood backing there are a few lines running behind the box into the bottom already. Moving the box out of the wall an extra inch or 2 will just give some extra space behind it, and like said, maybe lift it higher an inch or so was well.

I don't want to be playing with a live box either. I'm still another week or so from getting to this wall. And while I feel I can move it out 2 inches without even really opening up the box and just turning off the main, if there is no upstream shut off I may just call an electrician.
 
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Old 10-09-16, 07:39 PM
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The main feeder might be in conduit or a cable.

I would recommend just framing around the panel and leave a large enough opening to access the panel. Just make it big enough so that you can remove the cover and work in the panel. Finish it off with a cabinet door(s) to make it look nice.

If you mount the panel from the sides to studs, you will need to run screws into the studs from inside the panel.
 
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Old 10-09-16, 07:47 PM
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I would recommend just framing around the panel and leave a large enough opening to access the panel. Just make it big enough so that you can remove the cover and work in the panel.
Sorry T. I disagree.

Don't cut the opening too small. Allow some room to work around the panel. I'm so fed up of trying to work thru a cubby hole to get cables into the panel

Think ahead..... allow a little working room.
 
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Old 10-10-16, 03:31 PM
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Sorry, I wasn't clear. I shouldn't have used the word "Just".

I meant make it the opening big enough to allow removal of the cover, and the ability to work in and around the panel. I also agree with leaving room to get new cables into the panel at a later date is a good idea.

Too many people feel they need to finish every square inch of a home.
 
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Old 10-10-16, 04:54 PM
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And if aesthetics are important you can buy a pre-made cabinet door at Bigbox and hinge it over the opening. So long as it can swing clear it should be code compliant. This way you can leave plenty of room around the panel and it will still look good.
 
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