Replacing 15amp outlet question

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Old 10-11-16, 05:14 AM
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Replacing 15amp outlet question

My home recently flooded here in Louisiana. I have to replace about 50 of my standard duplex 15amp receptacles. My home is 25 years old and the wiring is 12 gauge. My existing 25 year old receptacles have the slots that will accept 12 or 14gauge wiring whereas the new 15amp receptacles today only accept 14 gauge wiring unless you wrap the 12 gauge wiring around the screws. Other than taking longer to do each receptacle is there any problem with doing that? I dont want to use 20amp receptacles.
 
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Old 10-11-16, 05:32 AM
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It is much better to use the screws.

Had you used the screws originally chances are you would not have needed to replace all those receptacles after they dried out.

Those push in connections have a greater tendency to oxidize gradually in humid weather causing power loss and overheating problems let alone oxidizing more readily in a flood which accelerates those problems.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 10-11-16 at 06:38 AM.
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Old 10-11-16, 05:37 AM
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Time and time again we have had people here who have had failures because the quick connect slots were used. We recommend never to use them. With quick connect the wire is held only by a thin spring finger that over time can become loose.

There is no reason to use 20 amp receptacles even on a 20 amp circuits as long as there are two places to plug in and a single duplex receptacle counts as two places.

You receptacles do have a ground wire don't they?

More expensive is back wired or side wired commercial receptacles where you just insert the wire and and tighten a screw instead of wrapping around a screw . Those might be a bit quicker and the connection is as good as wrapping around the screw because a plate tightened down by the screw holds the wire.
 
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Old 10-11-16, 06:08 AM
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Yes. All of my receptacles have a ground screw.
 
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Old 10-11-16, 06:42 AM
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Yes. All of my receptacles have a ground screw
Not the question. The question is does each box have a ground wire?
 
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Old 10-11-16, 07:20 AM
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Yes. All of my boxes have a ground wire.
 
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Old 10-11-16, 08:09 AM
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You also need to know code requirements for your area. When replacing outlets they may need to be updated to be AFCI protected.
 
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Old 10-11-16, 02:36 PM
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Is AFCI protected have anything to do with the covers that are in the outlets?
 
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Old 10-11-16, 03:24 PM
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No, you are thinking tamper resistant. You need that too. AFCI is arc fault protection.
 
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Old 10-11-16, 03:26 PM
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No it is a type of protection usually incorporated into the breaker. It's main purpose is to kill power in case of arcing on the circuit.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arc-fa...it_interrupter
 
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Old 10-11-16, 03:42 PM
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I bought standard 15amp outlets that have the tamper resistant devices. It also says it meets 2008 NEC Code requirements. I dont see anything about AFCI protection. Was that required by the 2008 NEC code?
 
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Old 10-11-16, 03:48 PM
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This is about breakers not receptacles. Some local code may require the breakers on circuits to be brought up to current code if major work is done. I seriously doubt your local authority requires it for new receptacles. No AFCI required in most cases in 2008 national code but local code can vary. I seriously doubt you need AFCI breakers.
 
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Old 10-11-16, 03:59 PM
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My local permit office has a memo on their website that says they have been enforcing the 2011 NEC code since January 2014. In the wake of the overwhelming amount of destruction around here I believe they are working with each homeowner to be as flexible as they can without sacrificing safety.
 
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Old 10-11-16, 04:25 PM
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This is about receptacles. If you are under the 2011 NEC, effective 1/1/14 circuits that require AFCI protection when a receptacle is replaced it needs to be a AFCI receptacle or protected by an upstream AFCI receptacle or the circuit needs to be put on a AFCI breaker. 2011 NEC 406.4(D)(4)
 
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Old 10-11-16, 04:46 PM
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How do you know if a circuit needs AFCI protection? Iam assuming the NEC code does not require ecery single outlet to be AFCI protected.
 
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Old 10-11-16, 05:01 PM
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The NEC list the circuits that require AFCI. It is about all outlet circuits by the now 2014 NEC.
 
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