Excess copper showing on receptacle screw terminal

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Old 10-12-16, 03:22 PM
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Excess copper showing on receptacle screw terminal

Is there any danger if there's a bit too much copper stripped when making a hook on a receptacle screw terminal?
 
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Old 10-12-16, 03:41 PM
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The nice thing about have a bit too much copper showing is it's so easy to snip off the excess.
 
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Old 10-12-16, 03:42 PM
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How much? Picture will help. Not out of the ordinary to have a little showing, but not past the plastic housing
 
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Old 10-12-16, 04:06 PM
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Yeah it's just about that. I was just wondering if there's any risk, like does it increase arcing or is it just cosmetic and works as normal?
Even in a wire nut, I often see excess but never extends beyond the wire nut. But there must be a point where wires are close enough but not quite touching where they would arc?
 
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Old 10-12-16, 05:52 PM
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But there must be a point where wires are close enough but not quite touching where they would arc?
That would depend on the voltage between the two conductors, but I can say that even with voltage as high as 277 volts they need to be almost touching (within 1/32") before they arc.
 
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Old 10-12-16, 06:44 PM
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Aren't all wires in a wire nut slightly separated until they get to there point where they are touching at the top the wire nut? It's shaped like a cone on the inside conducting surface.
 
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Old 10-13-16, 04:33 AM
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Not sure what you are worried about, but there is no arcing between conductors in a b cap if applied correctly.
 
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Old 10-13-16, 12:06 PM
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Let's say the 1/32" distance above is the distance where arcing might occur. Doesn't this mean if you leave more than 1/32" copper stripped, then it will arc to the wire screw on a receptacle?

The wire nut was a separate question as the connection a wire nut is presumably at the top of the wire nut. So, I'm wondering why arcing doesn't occur with the bare wire slightly below that.
 
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Old 10-13-16, 01:01 PM
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In a solid connection (wirenut or screw), the wires are at the same voltage potential (due to being connected). An arc cannot form if there is no voltage difference between the two surfaces.
 
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Old 10-13-16, 01:29 PM
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Is that why you get an arc plugging in a laptop charger to receptacles?
 
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Old 10-13-16, 07:38 PM
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No, it is because you have a potential load on the item you are plugging in.
 
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Old 10-14-16, 01:34 PM
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It's really both; you have a difference in potential between the receptacle and the charger, and you have somewhere for the current to go (into the large capacitors in the charger power supply).

If you have no where for the current to flow, no arc can form. This is why birds can land on a power line -- huge difference in potential between the bird and the line, but no where for the current to go. The bird has both his feet on the same line. If the bird touched the pole with his feet and the line with his wing it would be different story...
 
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