Installing new power strip in kitchen

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  #1  
Old 10-30-16, 01:53 PM
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Installing new power strip in kitchen

Hello!

In my apartment's kitchen, I have a wall outlet on the wall on one side of the sink, but I'd like to add several more outlets on the other wall, on the other side of the sink.

I don't own this apartment, so it's not like I can start adding more wall outlets, but I'm wondering if there's some way I can add a nice looking GFCI power strip and run the cord along the wall, plugged into the existing wall outlet.

Anyone know the details of how and if this could be done? The only GFCI power strips that I've seen are big, ugly, and industrial. I'm looking for something a little nicer and cleaner (similar to what a normal power strip looks like- but I can't use that since it's near the sink).
 
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Old 10-30-16, 04:17 PM
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Is the existing receptacle GFCI protected? If it is, then plugging a strip into it provides GFCI protection for the receptacles on the strip.
If it's not, perhaps super would consider updating the receptacle to GFCI, since that is generally easy and inexpensive, and being close to the sink, it should be GFCI.

Another option would be to plug one of these into the receptacle (assuming it's a standard duplex receptacle) to provide GFCI protection and then plug the strip into it.

https://www.amazon.com/Tower-Manufac...GWNYZ0J36&th=1


Extension cords and power strips are intended for short term, temporary use, but under the circumstances may be your best bet. I'd rather see a nicely installed power strip than a bunch of extension cords.
 
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Old 10-31-16, 09:58 AM
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Plugmold brand makes some decent semi-permanent strips that don't look bad, especially if you mount them right along the backslash or right under the upper cabinets. You can get them with flexible cord set on one side and fasten them to the wall with basic drywall anchors that would be easy to repair when you move out.
 
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