Exterior flashing nail hit wire, what now?

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Old 11-14-16, 07:52 AM
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Exterior flashing nail hit wire, what now?

Back in June a roofer installed flashing where a porch roof meets the house (20' length of wall). This past weekend I was painting up on an aluminum ladder and touched the flashing and got zapped. Meter reads 80ish volts coming thru when grounded to ladder. Breaker is not getting tripped. I've turned that circuit off.

Roofer said he would come out and find/remove the nail that hit the wire and it'll be fine, "Happens all the time and that's how you fix it." That doesn't sit well with me. Am I right to not be comfortable with leaving a damaged wire in the wall? What are the possible consequences so I can describe them to the roofer?

note: Getting to the wire from the inside would be a big pain since the inside wall is 4" diagonal boarded wood (fragile!) but obviously want it fixed the right way.

Thanks!!
 
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Old 11-14-16, 07:58 AM
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Usually you don't access a damaged cable..... you abandon it and run a new one.

Are you making the repair yourself or are you going to use an electrician ?

The way I handle a problem like that is to kill the circuit. Identify everything on the circuit. If possible.... inject a signal into the wire and trace it thru the wall. Disconnect the damaged cable and run a new one to replace it. Now... this is simplified and there's no real way for us to help you find the cable in the wall.

(as a homeowner I'd be concerned about the length of the nails used. Properly sized nails should not have hit a cable.)
 
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Old 11-14-16, 07:59 AM
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There are two options really. One is to open up just a section of the wall and replace the damaged piece of cable. This method usually requires that you install two junction boxes because there will not be enough slack to pull the cable into only one box. These boxes would need to be permanently accessible. The other option is to abandon the damaged section of cable by routing a new piece around it. You would need to identify the source and destination junction boxes, disconnect the offending cable, and find a new route for the replacement cable. Perhaps you can fish into an attic, basement or crawlspace to cause the least wall damage as possible. If you cut the old boxes out and replace them with old work boxes, it will give you a handhole inside the wall to do some fishing.
 
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Old 11-14-16, 02:59 PM
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Simply pulling the nail and saying it is good to go is complete hack work. The roofer needs to fix their screwup.
 
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Old 11-14-16, 03:20 PM
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That's why I was asking the nail length. It may not really be the fault of the roofer.
There are two possibilities....
1) too long a nail was used for the flashing and then shame on the roofer.
2) proper nails were used but the cable was run too near the outside sheathing.

During the summer I rough wired a flip house. It's blood work. How fast-how cheep can you do it. I was checking the stapling of cables on a wall stud and I found a nail between the stud and the cable. I figured I'd have problems in the house but I got lucky. I went out and asked the siders what the beef was with the long nails. It wasn't them.... it was the framers.

With the advent of air nailers..... I see way too many long nails used in construction. I've seen studs blown apart from all the nails. It's like one size fit all with the nail gun.
 
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Old 11-14-16, 06:54 PM
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Simply pulling the nail and saying it is good to go is complete hack work. The roofer needs to fix their screwup.
I agree, but wouldn't want a roofer working on my wiring. I'd want the roofer to pay a licensed electrical contractor to repair or replace the wiring.
 
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Old 11-14-16, 07:52 PM
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True, I meant it to mean on the roofers dollar, not that they should be pulling the wires.
 
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