Radon Remediation Fan Status Sensor

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Old 11-16-16, 06:24 AM
J
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Radon Remediation Fan Status Sensor

Thank you in advance for sharing your ideas and expertise. I recently had to change my 12 year old Fantech radon remediation fan. Fortunately, I believe it was only a short period of time during which it was not operating. Nonetheless, it was disconcerting that it was not working as it should.

I would like to install an indicator light in my basement to let me know if the fan is malfunctioning. My thoughts were either some sort of inline amperage sensor to determine if the fan is drawing power or alternatively, an in-line (downstream or upstream) air volume sensor placed in the pvc piping to sense air movement.

Can anyone suggest a solution? If so, a wiring diagram and parts list would be most appreciated. This is a bit above my "pay grade"

I believe there may be an OEM product in the market but it designed for another brand and is also a bit pricy.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 11-16-16, 10:19 AM
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Take a look at the draft sensors used on furnaces. They are inexpensive and are operated by the vacuum or pressure when the fan is running. In a furnace they detect when the exhaust fan is running and only allow the burners to run when the exhaust fan is running.
 
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Old 11-17-16, 05:43 AM
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Pilot Dane, thanks for the suggestion. I did some research and a draft sensor can work. A few questions:

1. It appears that the draft sensors I have seen are 24v. I assume I would need an inline 24v transformer on the input side to step down the 120v line voltage?
2. On the output side, I assume I use a 24v socket and bulb as the function indicator?
3. How do wire it so that the bulb comes on only when pressure is NOT sensed, as opposed to the designed function of the sensor to send power only when pressure IS sense? Is this even possible?

Thanks again.
 
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Old 11-17-16, 09:00 AM
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Most draft sensor switches are just dumb switches. The 24 volt is their rated voltage. You can use something less so a 5v or 12v transformer or power supply could be used. You could even use an old wall wort power supply and find an appropriate light. 12v would be easiest to work with as you'd have a lot of options for an LED light to use as an indicator.
 
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Old 11-17-16, 11:45 AM
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I have a manometer installed on one of the radon pipes. It's pretty obvious to see when it's working or not working.

(just an example, I don't know anything about this brand in particular)
https://www.amazon.com/RadonAway-500.../dp/B00HYZ28I6

I could see installing it with a longer tube too for 'remote monitoring'. I've also trained the wife to look at it whenever she's in the basement so one of the two of us would notice it pretty quickly.
I also like it since it's one thing that isn't electrically/battery powered in the house
 
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Old 11-17-16, 05:06 PM
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$15 and rock simple reliability. What's not to like.

What do you think the liquid is? Maybe a dyed mineral oil or something that won't evaporate away?
 
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Old 11-19-16, 03:24 PM
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Thanks for the suggestions. There is currently a manometer on the system. However the piping is located in an out of the way closet. I think the draft sensor route is the way to go. This way I can run an indicator light to a convenient place. Is there any way to reverse the functionality of the draft sensor so that an indicator light is powered when there is a fault in the system (i.e. No draft), as opposed to its designed function of sending power when there is draft. Perhaps a relay of some sort?
 
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Old 11-19-16, 06:24 PM
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A few switches have NO (normally open) and NC (normally closed) contacts so finding one would be great. Otherwise you can have a system where the light remains lit when the fan is operating and you go investigate when the light is not lit. Use a reliable LED and it could work. Or, if you want to have the light come on when the fan fails you can use a relay though it adds another possible failure point in the system.
 
 

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