Moving a dryer outlet to another location...

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Old 11-28-16, 12:35 AM
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Moving a dryer outlet to another location...

Hi guys, im doing some research right now about moving a dryer outlet which i think is a 220v from one closet to another.
I think i got the basics planned out, but i need to fill in some holes just to make sure.

The rough plan is to extend the wire over the ceiling/attic to the other closet since the floor is tile. (Ive noticed there are a bunch of cream colored plastic conduit wired about in the attic for the lights and 120v sockets)

First im still confused about the whole 120/240v vs 110/220v or 220v. Im reading conflicting answers but im guessing they are very similar. Some dryer will say 220v while others 120/240v but im guessing they both would use the same gauge wires (10-3?) even if the sockets are different?

The junction box. So am I suppose to connect the wires with the screw connectors inside the junction box, inside the drywall, screwed on to a wall stud. Should the hole in the wall be serviceable or can i patch it up.

Would i need a metal conduit or would the orange wire plastic be good enough, like the rest of the cream colored wires scattered in the attic.

I know i will have to drill a hole through the stud to get the wire through to the the attic.

Is there a rule to placing the outlet for a dryer? like about x inches off the floor or needs to be a foot away from the water outlet.
The current outlet pops out of the floor and is screwed to the wall externally at floor level, just like the oven outlet.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 11-28-16, 12:55 AM
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confused about the whole 120/240v vs 110/220v or 220v
110/220 and 220 are used by people not really familiar with modern residential wiring. Correct is almost always 120/240 rarely 240. You need 10-3 cable or conduit with two hots, a neutral, and a ground. If the conduit is metal it can be the ground. You will need a 4x4 box to make a splice if this is a self contained surface receptacle. See below:

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Ive noticed there are a bunch of cream colored plastic conduit wired about in the attic for the lights and 120v sockets
Do you mean cable? There is no cream colored conduit.
orange wire plastic be good enough
What you are describing is called cable. If it is 10-3 then yes unless cable isn't allowed in your area. Please correct your profile so we know where you are.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 11-28-16 at 05:22 AM.
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Old 11-28-16, 06:26 AM
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A cable fished into a wall or ceiling does not need to be secured or stapled like it would during new construction.
 
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Old 11-28-16, 01:35 PM
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Hey thanks for the assuring quick replies.

The apartment, now condo was built in 1980.

Yes the cream colored plastic wrapped "cables", just like the 10-3 wrapped in orange plastic.
They are scattered about in the attic beneath the crummy messy insulation.

I will start getting all the stuff i need!
 
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Old 11-28-16, 02:13 PM
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...inside the drywall, screwed on to a wall stud. Should the hole in the wall be serviceable or can i patch it up.
The junction box can't be patched over. I would secure the metal box to the bottom plate of the wall and a nearby stud if possible.
It would be better to use a mud ring to cover the 4 x 4 box so you can choose a decorative plate.
 
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Old 11-28-16, 02:38 PM
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Since the 4x4 box is metal you will need to pigtail the ground wire to the box.

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Old 11-29-16, 09:17 PM
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Thanks for clarifying.

So I've got most of the parts ready,
2 4x4 new work metal box,
4" mud ring,
25ft romex 10-3,
butterfly wire connectors,
1" speedbor bit

I havent bought the socket yet as I dont have the dryer now.

but now that i've seen a couple videos, im starting to think the old work blue plastic boxes would be a easier option with less mess...

Im reading some articles on this site about plastic vs metal but they are confusing and it seems like to each their own...

Should I go both plastic for the junction and socket box or both metal? or, metal for junction and plastic box for socket?

Is there a "benefit" to being able to ground metal boxes or it is a requirement just for using metal box. or is it a benefit of using plastic box as they dont need to be grounded.
 
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Old 11-29-16, 11:51 PM
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Plastic boxes are cheaper and do not require the grounding.

A metal box must be grounded so the breaker will trip if a hot contacts it.
 
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Old 11-30-16, 06:37 AM
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Hi,you say the old wire pop's up through the floor so you must have a basement,if so why not pull the cable down into basement and box it down there.
 
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Old 03-21-17, 04:32 PM
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Thanks for the helpful replies guys, I'm finally getting started on this project, had to do a couple other mandatory fixes in the place. I don't have a basement but the kitchen is right below the washer dryer closet.
So I got everything setup drilled holes on the stud, found out that there's 2 20amp circuit on a 12/3 which had me confused for a while, other than the 240v plug.

The question I have right now is that the old 240v recptrical only has 3 wires, where my new 10/3 wires have a 4th ground wire.
How should I splice the old 3 wire with the new 4 wire for extension?

Should I ignore the ground? Or do I connect it to neutral?
 
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Old 03-21-17, 05:24 PM
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The question I have right now is that the old 240v recptrical only has 3 wires, where my new 10/3 wires have a 4th ground wire.
How should I splice the old 3 wire with the new 4 wire for extension?
You can't extend an ungrounded cable. Code requires the new cable meet current code. You will need to run a new cable from the breaker panel.

If you have an insulated white wire at the old install you could run just a ground wire to the old install but usually if you are going to do that it is just as easy to run a new cable all the way.

Above based on earlier replies stating this is cable not conduit. Answer may vary for conduit.
 
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Old 03-21-17, 07:21 PM
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Ohhh ok, I wish I read this before i drilled a hole on the floor to wrestle the big wire into the wall lol.
Thanks for the reply, so I need a longer 10/3 wire from circuit breaker to the new room, and I can skip the splicing part.
Would connecting the old wire to the new and pulling it at the breaker be a good way to fish the wire?
 
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Old 03-21-17, 07:31 PM
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Would connecting the old wire to the new and pulling it at the breaker be a good way to fish the wire?
Probably not. It may be stapled.
 
 

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