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Please Help! Can a cooktop and oven be installed on the same circuit?

Please Help! Can a cooktop and oven be installed on the same circuit?

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  #1  
Old 11-30-16, 09:03 PM
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Please Help! Can a cooktop and oven be installed on the same circuit?

My apologies in advance as I am not sure whether I will make any sense given I know absolutely nothing about electricity and wiring! But I would appreciate any help before having an electrician come in to do the installation. The situation is that we just removed an electric range from our suite in the basement and would like to install a cooktop and oven that we own but have not used for a number of years. I was hoping this would be a straight forward job for the electrician to do (and therefore not too expensive) but it seems that it might be quite complicated. My question is " can both units be installed on the same line that the range was on or is it that a new line has to be made available for one of them (in which case there is a problem as there is no room avaliable in the electric panel)? Both units seem to require three-wire single phase 120/240, 60 Hz Ac circuit. Originally they came with circuit breakers (both 60 Amps). The specifications sheet says that the cooktop is 6.7 KW, 27.9 Amp and the oven is 3.5 KW and 14.6 Amp. Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 11-30-16, 09:22 PM
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I'm not an electrician so hold on for more advice. I do install many appliances.
You need two circuits.
A typical cook top with an oven underneath would have a 30amp breaker for the cook top and a 20amp for the oven (an undercounter oven is a single 30" wall oven in most cases).
Both the 30 and 20 amp circuits are double pole breakers and 4 wires.
The appliance may or may not require 4 wires, but it's best to run it.
 
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Old 11-30-16, 10:12 PM
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Code allows a cooktop and oven on a single 60a or less circuit.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 04:17 AM
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Sixty amps sounds like the breakers were oversized originally. A stove or ran
A stove is normally 40 or 50.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 03:41 PM
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Thanks for the replies. Ray2047, does it then mean that the oven and cooktop can share the circuit that the range had? How do I tell if it is 60a or not?
 
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Old 12-01-16, 04:33 PM
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Brreaker size is printed on the handle. If it is cable it should be 6-3 on a 50 amp breaker. If it is THHN in conduit it can be #6 on a 60 amp breaker.
 
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Old 12-01-16, 06:19 PM
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There exists a maximum circuit amperage rating that the cooktop may be connected to. This is in addition to the published maximum current draw. Same for the oven. If the sum of the maximum draws for the two items exceeds the maximum circuit amperage rating for either than you will not be able to use all the features of both items simultaneously if they are hooked up to the same circuit.

For example if each has a maximum circuit rating of 60 amps and each draws no more than 30 amps with all features in use then they can be on the same circuit without interfering with each other. In your case, with the oven drawing 14.6 amps, it may be intended for a 20 amp circuit or, even if rated for a 30 amp circuit, it should not share with this cooktop drawing up to 27.9 amps.

If the maximum circuit amperage rating is not stated on the name plate or in the instructions and the manufacturer can't tell you then you will have to assume that the suggested circuit rating is the maximum.

If the equipment comes with a cord and plug then the plug implies the maximum current rating for the circuit plugged into.

You could install a small subpanel in the kitchen to provide individual circuits for the cooktop and oven given a single circuit of sufficient amperage for both e.g. #6 fed by 60 amp breakers in the feeding panel.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 12-01-16 at 06:51 PM.
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Old 12-02-16, 09:44 PM
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Thank you Allanj, your comments were very helpful. I actually understood what you were saying (well, most of it . I checked the manuals and also the appliances if there was any information posted about maximum circuit amperage rating. I could not see any, but I will keep the subpanel idea in mind when I am talking to the electrician. Thanks so much!
 
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Old 12-03-16, 07:15 AM
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Conductors tapped from a 50A branch circuit for electric ranges, wall-mounted electric ovens, and counter-mounted electric cooking units must have an ampacity of at least 20A and be sufficient for the load [210.19(A)(3) Ex 2].

My code book is not the latest. Is this still current?
 
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