Support for ceiling fan

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  #1  
Old 12-02-16, 08:00 PM
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Support for ceiling fan

I am trying to figure out the best way to secure a ceiling junction box for ceiling fan.

Right now there is a flush mount ceiling light. The box itself is not secured to any roof framing. But it is very sturdy because there are five EMT conduits connecting to it in the attic with set screw connectors.

Here is a picture of what I mean - this is the picture of another box similar to it except this one has 4 conduits coming into the box where the one I am trying to mount a fan on has 5 conduits. That one is very hard to get to in a tight spot and I didn't have my camera with me so I took a picture of one closer to the attic hatch.



As you can see, it is close to impossible to place any lumber above, adjacent to it to secure the box. Yet it feels rock solid because of the conduits.

If I strap down all five conduits where they pass over or under any nearby truss members, and really tighten down on the screw on the connectors. Would that be secured enough to support a fan?
 
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Old 12-02-16, 08:10 PM
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One problem would be that it probably isn't a fan rated box. Fan rated boxes have heavier construction where needed to support the fan. And I wouldn't want to count on conduit supporting the box. The conduit connectors are not rated for that kind of load no matter how well the conduit is supported.

Would it be possible to mount a fan rated box using a fan brace near to the existing box, using a short piece of flex or conduit to connect the boxes? Then you could put a blank plate on the original box.
 
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Old 12-02-16, 08:38 PM
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I have to ask........ are you sure the box isnt secured to a ceiling joist? When I look at the pic, I see a nail through the joist on the left side of the junction box which certainly appears to be from the junction box, through the joist. The joist is actually split/busted because of the nail.

If I really wanted to secure it though, personally (& I dont know if its proper or allowed), I'd cut a 2 X 4 & place it between the joists & butt it up against the junction box closest to you taking the pic ... bottom (left side, right side, top side & bottom side). Once the 2 X 4 is secured to the joist on each side, I'd run a screw through the "bottom side" & into the 2 X 4.
I'd also run a screw through the left side of the junction box into the existing joist where I am saying I see the nail on the left side of the junction box. Just be absolutely sure you dont pinch or run a screw through the wire etc.

If this isnt acceptable, you guys who know better please correct me.
 
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Old 12-02-16, 08:50 PM
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That's correct it's not a fan rated box.
 
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Old 12-02-16, 08:58 PM
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@Dixie2012, as I stated in the original post, the picture you saw is NOT the actual picture of my box, but another one in the attic. I did not have my phone camera with me when I was at that spot in the attic where the head room was about 12" or so and I was on my belly.

This picture I posted is another box with a similar configuration so I took a picture of that instead to give you guys a general idea.

The actual box I wanted to mount the fan has FIVE conduits going into it, the center KO hole is also used. The one in the picture has 4 KO holes used.

In this picture you saw yes there is a nail but it's not fastened to a joist. It is fastened to a 1X3 ceiling furring. The framing was done with trusses spaced every 24", then 1X3 furring strips were secured across the bottom chords for the ceiling layer. The ceiling layer is a 1.25" thick two ply - one ply of 3/4" gypsum board with a 1/2" brown coat. That's why in the picture the 1.5" deep box is actually higher than the lumber which is only 3/4" thick there and offer little support.
 
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Old 12-03-16, 04:35 AM
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I think there is a bottom line with this. With 5 conduits entering the box, it is probably over filled, and a deeper box is needed to begin with. The box is not fan rated so it must be changed out to one that is fan rated. It will most likely be in an octagonal configuration rather than square.

I would modify the conduits into a junction box above and fastened to the joist, then run the required wiring to a fan rated box supported properly across the joists.
 
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Old 12-03-16, 05:32 AM
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Chandler, Good answer. The fan must have a fan rated box.
 
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Old 12-03-16, 05:58 AM
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@Dixie2012, as I stated in the original post, the picture you saw is NOT the actual picture of my box, but another one in the attic. I did not have my phone camera with me when I was at that spot in the attic where the head room was about 12" or so and I was on my belly.

This picture I posted is another box with a similar configuration so I took a picture of that instead to give you guys a general idea.
You are absolutely correct. My apologies. I read that, then went on with an incorrect response. It being one of my biggest pet peeves, I apologize.
 
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Old 12-03-16, 06:16 AM
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Chandler,you hit the nail on the head,it's a lot more work but only the correct way to do it.
 
 

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