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Condo wiring in metal conduit - necessary for small changes?

Condo wiring in metal conduit - necessary for small changes?

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  #1  
Old 12-13-16, 08:45 AM
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Condo wiring in metal conduit - necessary for small changes?

I own a condo in Maryland and need to make a couple very small electrical modifications, but I'm not familiar with what I encountered (though I am familiar with basic electrical work).

The first change is to move a receptacle in a bathroom where we have ripped out a linen closet to allow for a longer vanity. The existing wire is not long enough, so I plan to have a junction box accessible from inside the vanity (to replace the existing receptacle) and run new wire from there to the new receptacle location. Easy job, but with the wall open I see now the electrical wiring is all enclosed in metal conduit. I see also that the studs are metal studs. Is the metal conduit required because of the metal studs, or because of it being a condo, or is it not required at all? I'm hoping I can just run normal Romex out of that junction box to my new receptacle.

The other change is to replace a cloud light in the kitchen with 4 recessed cans. We haven't opened the ceiling yet but I anticipate finding the same thing.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 12-13-16, 09:51 AM
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Metal conduit isn't required just because you have metal studs. There are plastic bushings me that you can put in the metal studs that you can run Romex. However, local codes may require the use of conduit and condos and other multiunit buildings. Have you checked with local building officials or possibly even your condo board to see what requirements they may have for this work?
 
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Old 12-13-16, 04:49 PM
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I would recommend using MC cable. The cable and fittings are widely available at the home stores. No bushings needed.
 
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Old 12-14-16, 09:29 AM
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My understanding is there are no local codes that differ from NEC. Given that, is it acceptable to transition from MC cable to Romex in a junction box, and then connect to new receptacle with Romex (using proper bushings to feed Romex through the metal studs)?
 
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Old 12-14-16, 10:12 AM
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No.... the MC is used to connect the two.

MC is metal clad cable. Looks similar to BX cable. Two major differences are the MC has an insulated green ground and is constructed of an easier to use aluminum jacket.

More than likely if you are in a city proper.... you are not allowed to use NM-b (romex) cable.
This would be something adopted by the local building authority. You could call the building department and ask them.

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  #6  
Old 12-14-16, 11:06 AM
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Hey Pete thanks, I understand what MC cable is... that's what's in the place right now. What I meant was can I take the box that is currently a receptacle, take out the receptacle and use that box instead as a junction box, connect Romex to the wires coming out from the metal inside that box, and then use plain old Romex to go from that junction box to a very nearby new receptacle? All I'm trying to do is move a receptacle over a couple feet, but the existing wire / MC cable is not long enough to reach the new location. If I understand your answer I think you're saying no, I have to go from box to box with MC, but why would that be? Does NEC require that in a condo building? Thanks in advance for clarifying, and yes I will also try to call a local authority.
 
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Old 12-14-16, 11:42 AM
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I just found this on a website for the local authority: "Nonmetallic sheathed cable shall not be used in any multifamily dwelling or other structure exceeding a total of four (4) floors. "Floor" means the entire story of a building from floor to ceiling and shall be inclusive of all below-grade, split-grade or above-grade conditions. It shall also include all levels designed for human habitation and all levels not designed for human habitation." I read that to say that I'm okay using Romex, because this is a 3 story building with a garage level, so not exceeding 4 if you count the garage. Ah crap never mind, it's 4 levels plus garage. No Romex. Okay thanks all for the input, I have my answer.
 
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Old 12-14-16, 02:43 PM
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It would be fair to say that if the original builder could have used (cheaper) romex, they would have. Given that you have all metallic wiring methods, I would assume you can't do anything less than that.
 
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Old 12-14-16, 08:07 PM
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In any building over three floors, romex is a code violation nationwide.
 
  #10  
Old 12-15-16, 05:18 PM
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In any building over three floors, romex is a code violation nationwide.
I believe that code for not allowing nm cable in buildings over 3 floors was removed in the 2011 NEC.
 
 

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