Move up electrical outlet or not?


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Old 12-19-16, 12:58 PM
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Move up electrical outlet or not?

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In my basement I have 4 or 5 outlets which are only about 6 inches off the ground. That's from the floor to the bottom of the plate. I'm pretty sure these are to low and need to be moved up.

If I do have to move them up, do I have to cut the wires shorter? Plus I will probably have to remove a staple. Do I have to re-add the staple? Because space I'm sure will be tight.
 
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Old 12-19-16, 01:04 PM
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Here, in the States, they'd be fine. You can put receptacles in the baseboard too.

Not sure about your code.
 
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Old 12-19-16, 01:26 PM
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The NEC does not address mounting heights except for maximum heights to meet the required spacing. It is a design issue. Why do you feel they are too low?
 
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Old 12-19-16, 01:28 PM
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I'm in Canada if that matters. They look wrong to me. All other outlets in my house are around 12-13" off the ground.
 
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Old 12-19-16, 01:50 PM
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You should have put that it your first post.

You would need to determine if the wiring came from the floor.... if there's a basement below or from the ceiling if there's an attic.... and if it's long enough to reach where you want it to.

The boxes are most likely nailed to the studs. That means you'll have to cut a hole around the box to remove it and then patch it.
 
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Old 12-19-16, 02:05 PM
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No small amount of work to move them since the drywall is finished. My 2: Learn to live with them.
 
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Old 12-19-16, 02:38 PM
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It's like when the electrician mounts them too low and the customer wants 7" speed base......the trim carpenter has to adapt, improvise and overcome. Had to do this on one job.

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Old 12-19-16, 03:52 PM
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Another vote for leaving them alone.
Just looking at the picture, it looks like they were installed with care.

The only time I move receptacles up is in a kitchen, and it's no fun.
You also have to consider that maybe they were placed at that height for a reason.
 
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Old 12-19-16, 06:24 PM
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I would also leave them. I would suspect if only a few are at that height, there might be a reason.
 
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Old 12-20-16, 10:12 AM
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It's like when the electrician mounts them too low and the customer wants 7" speed base......the trim carpenter has to adapt, improvise and overcome. Had to do this on one job.
Dangit Larry! Where were you three days ago when I ran into the EXACT same issue and did not do nearly as nice a job as you did.


As for the original question, if the wires go up into the wall, they can be pretty easily moved up. You don't have to cut the wire - but you will have quite a bit of drywall patching to do.
As far as I know, there's no Canadian code that specifies a minimum receptacle height.
 
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Old 12-20-16, 06:23 PM
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If you really want to move that outlet higher, you can do that without cutting drywall if wire is from the top and junction box is plastic type.

You can cut nails on junction box with hex saw with handle on only one side or reciprocating saw with a small metal blade. Careful not to cut to deep or high and damage cable.
Once you cut 2 nails on top and bottom, junction box will come right out.

Then you can cut a hole for remodel junction box above. This will also give you access behind drywall and can remove wire staple through this hole. Diagonal cutter is great for removing staples. Grab one end of the staple with it and use it like prybar.

You can patch old hole using this method.
Drywall Patches | Jasongraphix

No need for wood behind or screws as the hole is small.
 
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Old 12-20-16, 10:43 PM
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Since all the holes would be next to studs I would use the Smartboxes that screw to the studs.
 
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Old 12-21-16, 05:12 AM
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Thanks everyone for your suggestions. I did move one up and it was a pain. Getting the nails remove from the junction box took a while. I think I'm going to be leaving the other outlets alone.
 
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Old 12-21-16, 05:52 AM
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Getting the nails remove from the junction box took a while
You don't remove the nails. You cut them by running a Sawzall between the stud and the box. Or use a hack saw blade with a duct tape handle. However like others I see no reason to move them.
 
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Old 12-23-16, 01:54 PM
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Conversely, you might be able to cut the nails with an oscillating cutting tool.
 
 

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