New range, replace or use old wiring?

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Old 01-06-17, 06:55 PM
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New range, replace or use old wiring?

I'm installing a new range. After removing the old stove, I discovered the cable used was 6AWG stranded aluminum. Because of when the original house was built (and stove installed, 1984), it uses a 3 conductor cable, hardwired to the stove. The aluminum wire is hooked up to 50A breakers.

I know at a minimum I should install an outlet (instead of hardwiring the new stove), but I'm wondering if I should also replace the existing run with a copper cable (8/3?). The run is fairly short (< 10'), and I have easy access to the old cable run since the bottom of the floor is open to the basement.

Other than the cable - should I replace the 50A breakers with 40A breakers, or can I simply use the existing ones? Again, as with the wiring, breakers are original.

Finally, I'm not quite sure how to switch from 3 to 4 wires, though I suspect it is fairly straightforward.

Thanks!

John
 
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Old 01-06-17, 07:37 PM
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Use 6-3 NM-b. The breaker is fine. At the new stove you disconnect ground from neutral. The manual for your stove should show how.
 
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Old 01-06-17, 07:58 PM
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Hi Ray,

Thanks for the quick reply - by 6/3 NM-b, does that include a ground conductor? Is it stranded?

And yes - to do a 4-conductor install on the stove, the instructions say to remove the ground strap and attach the ground wire to the ground plate and screw it into the frame of the range.
 
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Old 01-06-17, 08:14 PM
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A 6-3 cable will have a ground. It will be labeled 6-3 w g. It will be stranded.
 
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Old 01-07-17, 10:34 AM
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Last question. I went to the store to buy everything. The stove - GE JS750EFES - recommends a 4' cord because of the drawer unit. The only 4' cords were rated for 40A - they did have 50A cords but they were 6'.

I bought the 4' cord, but it makes me wonder whether it is safe since the cord has a lower rating than the circuit breakers.
 
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Old 01-07-17, 10:57 AM
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Was the plug correct on the cord you bought? There aren't any standard 40 amp plugs or receptacles. What is the amp rating of the stove?

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Old 01-07-17, 12:37 PM
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12.6KW - instructions specify a 40A cord. The cord is 8AWG, 4 conductor - GE model WX09X10035.
 
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Old 01-07-17, 12:40 PM
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And yes - the plug is correct.
 
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Old 01-07-17, 01:33 PM
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Then it should be okay. .
 
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Old 01-07-17, 02:20 PM
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Great. The instructions in the cord bag say it can be used with 40 or 50A stoves. Additionally, it is a lot shorter than 4' - maybe 3'.
 
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Old 01-07-17, 08:28 PM
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Installed! Wiring went smoothly. I did a quick test and the burners work, but shut off power for the night. I shouldn't be this way, but am a bit uneasy with a new product like this, specifically an electronically controlled one (old stove was all mechanical, including the timer).

My biggest complaint is the outlet box I bought. The screw terminals slide to the side so the wire can be lowered in, but they are sized *exactly* the width of the terminal body. This means that when tightening the screw down on the wire, there is no leeway for them to move. I used a pair of pliers to hold them in place while I tightened them, seems to have worked, but I don't trust them.

Another question - torquing the connections. I tightened everything down to a point where I felt like it was adequately tightened - but not so much that conductors started breaking. Should I try to borrow a torque screwdriver and set everything to the required amount? I have a fairly good track record with doing electrical work around the house, but the higher current stuff makes me a bit uneasy.
 
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