Quality receptacles?

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Old 01-12-17, 07:33 PM
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Question Quality receptacles?

I'm all wired up and soon have about 25 receptacles to put in my basement. I am assuming the cheepo bulk packs are no good? Most of the receptacles will be 20amp circuits do they make standard plug 20amp or are the good 15 amp rated at 20amp? Forgive me if I am using the wrong terminology.
 
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Old 01-12-17, 07:35 PM
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Use 15A receptacles but buy the spec grade.
They may run a dollar or two more than the standard ones but will be well worth it.
 
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Old 01-12-17, 07:44 PM
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Thank you. Will they say spec grade on them? Do you recommend a specific brand??
 
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Old 01-12-17, 08:53 PM
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If you go to one of the home improvement stores you may find Leviton.
Possibly Hubbell.
Pass and Seymour/Legrand are really nice but on the upper end of the cost ladder.

You didn't mention standard devices or Decora. Not as many choices for Decora.
 
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Old 01-12-17, 10:51 PM
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And buy the nylon (labeled unbreakable?) face plates. Nothing worse than good receptacles and a bunch of cracked face plates.
 
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Old 01-13-17, 04:01 AM
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Although about $2 each I prefer these due to the fact you don't have to make a shepherd's crook to apply the wiring. They have clamps that allow you to put a stripped wire under and tighten the screw down.
 
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Old 01-13-17, 08:52 AM
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I have never had an issue with the P&S 3232 receptacles at less than $1 each.
 
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Old 01-13-17, 07:10 PM
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I have never had an issue with the P&S 3232 receptacles at less than $1 each.
I agree. I have never had a problem with the less expensive residential grade devices from Leviton, Hubbell or P&S. They will still last 20+ years if installed correctly. For a designated heavy load device I might consider buying the commercial grade, but still 15 amp rated.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 06:44 AM
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I have never had an issue with the P&S 3232 receptacles at less than $1 each.
+1 These are my go to devices. We use the 3232S for commercial as they are self grounding.

There is no need for 20 amp receptacles unless you have some equipment that requires that configuration. I also recommend just using 15 amp. They have the same parts inside.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 02:17 PM
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I already purchased the 20amp arc faults. I got a great deal 7 Eaton Circuit Breaker 20-Amp (CHFCAF120CS) for $100 NIB shipped! arc faults are code here.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 02:20 PM
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Thanks everyone for the input. So are we in agreement that Pass and Seymour Legrand 3232 or 3232‑S are the way to go? If I use the 3232‑S what do I do with the copper ground wire if they are self grounding?
 
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Old 01-14-17, 02:51 PM
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Self grounding would only apply to a metal box. You would still attach the grounding wire to the green screw on the receptacle/switch.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 02:53 PM
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It depends. If you used metal boxes then you can connect the ground wire to the steel box using a green grounding screw or ground lead. If you used plastic boxes, the ground wire still needs to be connected to the ground screw on the device.

Eaton Circuit Breaker 20-Amp (CHFCAF120CS) for $100 NIB shipped! arc faults are code here
I hope your panel is rated for Eaton breakers and you used #12 wire.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 04:52 PM
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Thank you Chandler and Tolyn.

Yes, it should be it is a cutler hammer box so they should be the correct ones. Yes, all 12 gauge wire was run through out .
 
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Old 01-14-17, 05:52 PM
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Actually, is there a limit to how many amps can be drawn off of a panel? My main shut off is a duel 100 amp. I attached a picture if that helps.

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Old 01-14-17, 06:47 PM
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Limit is based on the actual expected load at any time not the sum of the breakers.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 06:52 PM
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Got it, thanks again.
 
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