Installing an outdoor wall mounted light.

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Old 01-17-17, 09:37 AM
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Installing an outdoor wall mounted light.

I want to install alight like this one. Name:  IMG_1154.jpg
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Size:  29.6 KB I'm not sure how to mount it though. Do I mount one of those 1/2" round boxes on the outside of the siding, then a regular metal box on the inside? Should I go through just the metal siding, or through the horizontal girt? I know this is pretty straightforward, but I'm drawing a blank on how to do it. Thanks John.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 09:46 AM
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Should I go through just the metal siding, or through the horizontal girt?
Is the inside finished or unfinished?
 
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Old 01-17-17, 09:46 AM
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Thinking you would just drill a hole for the wire to go through, connect to light and then screw the light to the siding, no box needed!

Mod note: That would be a code violation unless the device had an integral junction box. Most lights including the one shown in the picture don't.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 09:54 AM
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Thinking wrong Mark. You always need a junction box unless the device has one. Most lights of the type he wants to use don't.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 11:01 AM
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The inside is unfinished.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 11:15 AM
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You could cut in an old work device or fixture box or mount a new work box flush with the outside finish surface. You could also use a siding box.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 12:39 PM
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This is the rough setup that I've installed. Name:  IMG_1146.jpg
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Size:  36.1 KBive since rerouted the conduit in front of the box, to run through it,on the way to the light switch. Edit. This pic should be rotated 90 degrees clockwise.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 12:50 PM
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On corrugated steel buildings I prefer to mount an exterior grade box on the outside of the building and only drill through enough for the cable. Note you need to use a conduit sleeve or a plastic bushing to prevent the steel from cutting the cable. The reason is that is it virtually impossible to seal a large penetration through that type of siding unless you're very careful to only get on a flat spot of the siding and the pattern your siding isn't too deep. Otherwise the light fixture will set crooked due to the ribs in the siding and be very tough to seal up without big globs of caulking on top of the fixture base.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 01:58 PM
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Thats great info. Thank you. And just to be clear, I run the cable through the hole into the junction box I have pictured? Also can I go through that 2X4 that the box is currently mounted to, or should I move the box up so its sitting on the 2X4, and resting against the siding? thanks. John.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 02:40 PM
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If you use the box pictured, you need a raised cover that will be cut through the siding only. The box itself stays inside mounted to the edge of the 2x4.

The method I described uses an exterior "Bell Box" entirely on the outside of the building. The only penetration through the siding is a 7/8" hole into the back of the box. You can screw the box to the building with pole barn screws and line it up to hit at least one into a girt. You can also use a close nipple and locknut to screw the bell box right to the siding or a chase nipple and provide safe passage for the cable.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 03:31 PM
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You will need a cable connector to connect the cable to the box.
 
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Old 01-17-17, 04:27 PM
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Ok, almost done. Even if I use an exterior box, I still need a junction box on the inside, to receive the cable, and wire nut it to the THHN. Correct? And, the close nipple with lock nuts in both boxes would
"sandwich" the siding between the two boxes?
 
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Old 01-17-17, 04:31 PM
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Where does the cable connector go? If the box or boxes are flush to the siding, and the cable comes through the center knockout, I'm not sure where one would fit. Wouldn't the close nipple with the locknuts be in that spot?
 
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Old 01-17-17, 08:00 PM
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The THHN will need to be in conduit to a junction box.

A nipple from the box would take the place of the cable connector if you go back to back.
 
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