Replacing Bryant BR 290 under meter outside

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Old 01-31-17, 06:53 PM
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Replacing Bryant BR 290 under meter outside

I hate to just pop in but I'd like to try to fix this I have to jam to the EU on a work issue issue and have a couple of days to fix this. - We have at the box outside where the meter is a breaker a BR290. The recent storms up here in the Santa Cruz Mountains had us losing power through out the area almost everyday.

The PG&E guys and gals are heroes and I don't use that word lightly. Anyhow, last time it went out last week the houses around us came back on but not ours. Called PGE and a truck was in the area he came by and wiggled the breaker outside under the meter and it all came back on. He mentioned it was pretty old and corroded a bit etc.

I gave him a nice bottle of High West reserve Rye Whiskey and thanked him. I think it needs to be replaced we are slowly losing power to different parts like the oven, heat pump occasionally lights flickering.

Is this a job where now that I know the problem, I just yank the old one out and gently slap the new one in? I saw him do it, but he is a pro I just investigate bad guys, gals, groups so a bit out of my expertise.

Or is this something I should have the mother in law do while I stand back a safe distance? kidding of course- I would be WAY down the road not just a safe distance.

Thanks in advance for any help.- and in all seriousness, if this is a pro job or a dangerous that is fine, I'll make sure my mother in law does the really scary stuff or I'll hire someone much smarter than I am.
 
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Old 01-31-17, 07:17 PM
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This is going to depend on whether there is the ability to shut down power to the 90 or will the meter need to be pulled. What does the 90 serve? A picture might help.

Another consideration is going to be the condition of the bus bar connections. If they are pitted you may need to replace the panel.
 
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Old 01-31-17, 07:21 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

First off..... we need pictures. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

Usually, a main breaker cannot be replaced without pulling the meter out.
Without pictures we cannot comment on your application.

You may not have a bad breaker.
It is very possible where the breaker attaches to the bus bars is burned/corroded
 
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Old 01-31-17, 08:05 PM
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It is very possible where the breaker attaches to the bus bars is burned/corroded
If I understood the first post correctly this is Bryant equipment which would have aluminum bus bars. Aluminum bus is highly susceptible to corrosion, pitting and burning. Pcboss may very well be right that the equipment needs to be replaced. A replacement BR290 breaker might buy you a few weeks.
 
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Old 02-01-17, 09:37 AM
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All, thanks for the replies! Some stuff came up at work last night that I had to attend to and didn't check this until this AM. I have one picture but I'll take more when I get home.

The picture doesn't show much- directly above the housing for this breaker is a digital meter the kind that I believe sends out a signal so that the PGE staff doesn't have to actually walk up to the meter to read it.

When the PGE guy came out, the power was good up to the meter but down at the breaker. The PGE guy tested it with a meter and said it was all fine up to where the hot and ground wires that you can see above the circuit, I assume that is how he knew it was likely the breaker. If I remember correctly he just pulled the breaker out. looked at the back blew on it and replaced it and the power came back on. He didn't actually turn anything off before pulling the breaker (to the best of my recollection) Where we live is up in Santa Cruz mountains on the Pacific side so we get a good deal of fog and moisture almost every night.

The hinges and other hardware on the box are pretty corroded but not horribly corroded. I assume that indicates there is at least a bit of moisture creeping in there. Anyhow, I'll ost a better picture when I get home.

 
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Old 02-01-17, 09:41 AM
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If I understand the question This seems to be what is between the power company line and the house. Inside the house are two other panel that has the heat pump, the laundry, dishwasher, lights , detached, garage etc etc.
 
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Old 02-01-17, 09:46 AM
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I highlighted the bus connections in blue. The right one looks like it may be worse and may be corroded.

The yellow arrow is pointing what looks like burned insulation.

Be advised that the two red circles are indicating the main incoming hot wires which cannot be killed without removing the meter.

The breaker can be replaced without removing the meter but must be done carefully.
I would place that slightly above most DIY'ers experience.

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  #8  
Old 02-01-17, 12:57 PM
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wow ok thank you so much for the help- I'll have a pro come out and take care of it!.

thanks again all!
 
 

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