Wiring sub panel for pool

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  #41  
Old 02-11-17, 06:07 PM
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Here is the inside of the panel with the conversion and longer grounding bar.

 
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  #42  
Old 02-12-17, 08:29 PM
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Can anyone give me the codes for adding a 220 outlet plug for the pumps? Was thinking over the weekend that it would be nice to have a plug so I can take pumps in during the winter. Will already have unions on the plumbing to disconnect.
 
  #43  
Old 02-12-17, 09:09 PM
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Can anyone give me the codes for adding a 220 outlet plug for the pumps?
You have 240v not 220v. You would use a receptacle. For 20 amps, 1HP you would use a NEMA L5-20 twist lock receptacle and plug. NEMA L6-20 for 2 HP.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 02-12-17 at 09:26 PM.
  #44  
Old 02-12-17, 10:03 PM
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No one seems to have followed up on your pool light issue. The pool lights I have are connected to a wet conduit that runs to a junction box well beyond the pool rim (actually outside the pool fencing). When I say wet conduit, I am implying that it is a conduit containing pool water. The cable from the light fixtures are permanently attached to the fixture with the intent that the cables run in water. The junction box is well above water level -- I don't know what code requires -- but the connections are made there to a dry conduit that runs from the subpanel. Is this what you will have? At this point in time, many pool owners are converting their pool lights to 12V LEDs. The lower wattage saves energy, and the 12V conversion reduces shock risk.
 
  #45  
Old 02-13-17, 07:57 AM
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Thanks Ray, you are correct, it is 240V. I was in a hurry when I typed that. Thanks for the info.. I had read that if the pump is more than 10 feet away from the pool that you could use a standard 240V plug, not a twist lock plug. Is that true? Would the liquidtight conduit from the plug to the pump be acceptable? I recall something about the cable being less than 3 feet long. Do the make a special male plug to accept the conduit?
 
  #46  
Old 02-13-17, 08:04 AM
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Sonofprim, What you describe is what I have without the "dry" conduit from the junction box to the subpanel. That is the wire that was lying on the ground when I purchased the house. I buried it to keep anyone from tripping or it getting cut but now I want to make sure its to code. From what I have read and the help of this forum I now know that it needs to be single strand wire so the ground is insulated. One question... My junction box currently has an on/off switch for the cover. Is that to code or should it be a solid cover? The box and conduit are to code as far as I can tell but I do need to add the insulated ground from the light niche to the junction box as it appears to never have been installed.
 
  #47  
Old 02-13-17, 02:39 PM
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Conduit to Pool Light Junction Box

Someone yes should speak up here about applicable code. However, all I've encountered for pool light connections are the special juntion boxes like the Intermatic PJB2175, and none of these that I've seen support a switch on the junction box. You may have a product that supports switches, but I'd check the literature to be sure. The pool junction boxes are more expensive than regular outdoor JBs like you would use for swithes and receptacles, but hardly prohibitive. This may be one other place where your predecessor was trying to do this on the cheap (non-compliant).

So, will you be adding a second conduit (dry) to the junction box so that the new wires can be inside? The Mod has commented that you can't use UF-B, so, I'd conclude the only permitted connection would have to be in conduit -- which is standard practice.

I think you are misinterpreting the solid grounding wire issue. The citation is for grounding inside subpanel. The only cable or wire in the conduit running from the niche should be the sealed cable attached to the light fixture. Inside the fixture, there will be a ground wire connected to the fixture shell, if that shell is made of metal.
 
  #48  
Old 02-13-17, 08:56 PM
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I will be running dry conduit from the panel to light with the THWN wire. I currently do not have the wire from the niche to the j box. I plan to add that also.
 
  #49  
Old 02-14-17, 02:00 PM
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Lighting is typically composed of :
1 a niche connected by a wet water filled conduit to a pool lighting junction box.
2 a dry conduit connecting the pool lighting junction box to the subpanel
3 a pool light fixture with a permanently (factory) attached cable that runs from the fixture, through the niche to the junction box -- with enough slack in the cable so that the fixture can be removed from the niche and pulled out of the water for servicing
4 thwn wires running from the junction box to the subpanel
 
  #50  
Old 02-14-17, 08:37 PM
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I have read that per code an insulated ground has to be ran from the inside of the light niche to the junction box. Then putty applied to the cable lug in the light niche. The wire does not go to any bonding or to the sub panel. Just terminates in the junction box.
 
  #51  
Old 02-15-17, 05:13 PM
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I stand corrected, regarding the ground wire from the niche to the junction box.
 
  #52  
Old 02-20-17, 08:15 AM
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Another few questions for you all....

I am running 1.5" conduit from the main panel to the sub panel. I will then have an automation panel mounted beside my sub panel that has a side connection with 2.5" conduit. Can I feed the automation panel and return from the automation to the sub panel in the same conduit so all the wires can run together from the sub panel to the item they are powering?

Can I run all of the wires from the sub panel to a junction box just above ground level and then have them branch out from the junction box? I would rather do this than have a half dozen conduits running down the wall from the sub panel to the ground. If the junction box is not acceptable, what would my other options be?
 
  #53  
Old 02-20-17, 08:46 AM
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Yes on the conduit nipple from the subpanel to the automation panel. As long as it is less than 24" you can put as many wires through as you wish.

Yes on branching conduits from a junction box.
 
  #54  
Old 02-20-17, 11:38 AM
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Does code require a certain size junction box? I seen some that are about 9" x 9" with no holes. I assume you would need to drill your own holes as needed?
 
  #55  
Old 02-20-17, 12:02 PM
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Yes a certain size is required, and the rules a little complicated on determining that size. A 9x9 is probably more than adequate for reasonable pool equipment. You need to drill your own holes in the box.
 
  #56  
Old 02-20-17, 12:33 PM
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Awesome. Thanks! I feel that i have everything ready to install. Just trying to finish up the details and be sure it stays within code. I hope I'm not wrong in assuming that a junction box can have more than one feeder circuit from the sub panel? I know its not recommended in a typical outlet or switch box.
 
  #57  
Old 02-20-17, 12:58 PM
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Hope these rules help: you can have multiple conduits to one junction box, multiple circuits in one conduit, but all conductors (hot, neutral & ground) of any given circuit must be in the same conduit. All circuits in any given conduit may share a ground which is sized to match the largest circuit in the conduit. All conduits must have at least one ground.
 
  #58  
Old 02-20-17, 01:13 PM
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Thats what I was looking for. Thanks! Most of my runs are short so I will be installing a ground for each circuit, but it's good to know thats allowed...
 
  #59  
Old 03-02-17, 02:17 PM
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One more quick question. I have everything setup now but need to ask this just in case. When I run my wire from the sub panel to the pool pump motor (240V) do I need a black, red and green wire or can I use a black, white and green wire? I know when an install uses sheathed cables they are allowed to use the white as the second hot but never thought about it in this situation of individual cables. Any suggestions?
 
  #60  
Old 03-02-17, 02:30 PM
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In conduit white wires can only be used as neutrals. Hots must be any color other than white, gray or green.
 
  #61  
Old 03-02-17, 03:11 PM
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You can just use two blacks and a green. No need to use separate colors for the ungrounded conductors on single phase since they're interchangeable.
 
  #62  
Old 03-02-17, 04:33 PM
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That's what I wanted to hear. Thanks guys!
 
  #63  
Old 03-06-17, 08:59 AM
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I finally have the sub panel and automation panel installed and about 3/4 of the wiring roughed in. While working on this I thought of a few more questions.

Since the sub panel and automation panel are both metal boxes, do they need to be bonded to the bonding grid?

Does the automation panel need to be grounded to the sub panel? They are currently connected with a 2" PVC pipe and about 4" apart (Side by side). The automation panel only has hots entering the panel from the breakers (in sub panel) to a relay (in the automation panel), then they run from relay's thru the sub panel and then to items they are operating.

I was also going to pre wire the sub panel to be 100A even though I was only going to install 60A breakers. I was unable to find #3 wire in anything other than black. From what I have read the wires have to be Green, Black, White and Red. Is that true? I ended up going with #6 wires.
 

Last edited by joshua5438; 03-06-17 at 09:25 AM.
  #64  
Old 03-07-17, 07:41 AM
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anyone have any thoughts on my above questions?
 
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