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Portable A/C unit tripping circuit breaker, looking for a solution.

Portable A/C unit tripping circuit breaker, looking for a solution.

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  #1  
Old 03-24-17, 11:10 AM
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Portable A/C unit tripping circuit breaker, looking for a solution.

Hi,

This is my first post. I would appreciate if someone can help me.

My portable AC unit keeps triggering the circuit breaker. All the plugs in the living room seem to be on the same circuit. So if you run the tea kettle, this triggers a the breaker.

Is there anyway to get around this? Plug it into something that won't be affected by all the major appliances?

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 03-24-17, 11:47 AM
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It sounds like the circuit is being overloaded. You need to remove some load or install a new circuit for the AC.
 
  #3  
Old 03-24-17, 11:51 AM
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The circuit breaker is doing it's job. If you overload the circuit it will trip the circuit. Tea kettles, space heaters, toaster ovens and air conditioners all draw a lot of current. It is not uncommon for two high drain items to trip the breaker. You can plug your kettle or AC into another circuit like moving your kettle to the kitchen. Or, simply make sure that you don't run both the kettle and AC at the same time.
 
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Old 03-24-17, 11:56 AM
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Thanks Guys. the place is open concept though, with the Kitchen and living room combined. I don't have a problem overloading it, but my AirBnB guests do.

I think I may have to have a new circuit installed then. Any idea how much that costs to have an electrician instal? Does not sound like something I can do myself, or can I?
 
  #5  
Old 03-24-17, 11:59 AM
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Almost impossible for us to give you any type of accurate price.

Open concept usually means limited wall space for running wiring and receptacle location.
Having a basement will help the installation.

Look at the panel location. Now look at the location where you need the receptacle.
Is the wiring path wide open and accessible ?
 
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Old 03-24-17, 12:34 PM
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Any estimate given here would be pure speculation. It needs to be seen in person.
 
  #7  
Old 03-27-17, 10:06 AM
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It's a condo with no basement.

What about tying it into the same circuit as the baseboard heater? It that possible? ...since either one or the other is used.
 
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Old 03-27-17, 04:16 PM
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Baseboard heat is commonly 240 volts. The circuit does not have a neutral .
 
  #9  
Old 03-28-17, 08:10 AM
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You have options so far as fixing an overloading problem. Sometimes there may be a refrigerator or other power hog on a circuit. In that case it may be easier for an electrician to run a new separate circuit to that refrigerator, then that frees up all the other outlets.

Or have a new outlet/circuit installed just for the A/C unit. This can be easily done if on an outside wall. Or if you have an easily accessible basement/attic.

So just call an electrician (or several) for an estimate.
 
 

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