GFCI question

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Old 03-24-17, 07:18 PM
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GFCI question

This GFCI circuit has 3 outlets, 1 in garage and 2 in bathrooms. Wires from the main panel come to the garage outlet. GFCI is installed in this outlet. Wires leave this outlet to bathrooms.

A laundry washer is connected to the garage outlet. Has been this way for years. No issues until a few months back. GFCI got tripped. Replaced GFCI. Same result. Searched internet. Old washers leak small current because of copper insulation deterioration and are to be connected to non-GFCI circuit.

I can expand the garage outlet (single to double), and leave GFCI in one and install non-GFCI in the other. Connect washer to the other.

Here is my question. If I connect Main > Non-GFCI > GFCI > 2 bathroom, will the non-GFCI be non-GFCI (sounds weird)? In other words, does GFCI protect what is "downstream" and not "upstream"?
Thank you.

PS: I find the washer stopped at the end of drain always. When GFCI is reset, cycle starts with filling the tub with water.
 
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Old 03-24-17, 07:31 PM
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can expand the garage outlet (single to double), and leave GFCI in one and use non-GFCI in the other. Connect washer to the other.
No. There is no exception to the rule.
This GFCI circuit has 3 outlets, 1 in garage and 2 in bathrooms.
Under current code the bathroom receptacles and garage receptacles can't be on the same circuit however it is probably grandfathered.

At the very least I would switch the cable from the garage to the bathroom from load side to line side of the GFCI receptacle and then replace the first receptacle in the bathroom with a GFCI receptacle. Any additional bathroom receptacles would be from the load side of the bathroom receptacle. Bathroom lights should be on the line side not load of the bathroom GFCI. Doesn't solve your problem but eliminates the washer killing power to the bathroom.

The washer needs to be fixed or replaced. Ideally the garage power needs to be on a separate breaker to bring it up to current code.
 
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Old 03-24-17, 07:36 PM
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Old washers leak small current because of copper insulation deterioration and are to be connected to non-GFCI circuit.
Don't believe everything you read on the internet.

If an old appliance just started tripping a GFI circuit then it should be checked for problems.
It could be a motor problem or a chafed wire or something has gotten wet.
 
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Old 03-24-17, 07:57 PM
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The gfi is tripping and preventing a shock hazard to a person. Repair or replace the washer.

Newerror codes require gfi protection for washers. The non gfi exception has been removed from the code for garage receptacles.
 
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Old 03-24-17, 08:44 PM
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Thank you for advice. Separating bathroom wall outlets from garage is difficult. But I can install a non GFCI on the line side and GFCI in the bathroom. Also I will check the washer wiring.
 
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