120v feed to sub panel from secondary source.

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-13-17, 05:06 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 18,139
Received 55 Votes on 48 Posts
120v feed to sub panel from secondary source.

I have a 200 amp main panel
I have a 120v only generator
I have a 6 switch transfer switch
I have a 3 wire inlet for gen twist lock.

To get my 120 volt from the gen I tied the two hots together in the transfer switch. It is/was wired for 240

This probably was not the best way to do it but its done and been this way for years.

I probably should of left it 240 and just customized a cord and tied a jumper across the two hots in the plug end.

With that said I want more circuits, but dont want to do what I did with this switch unless I have too.

I do want the ability to have may main panel still run off line power and run some items off an alternate power source/ Particularly solar..

My current gen set up will do this.

I aquired 5000 watts of solar panels basically.

Ill add more to this soon..
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-14-17, 04:13 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
What is the run amperage of the generator? Will it handle more circuits? Have you pulled the tie handles off the switch gear breakers to make them 120 volt? Solar panels are DC, so you have to invert them somehow. Have you done that, yet?
 
  #3  
Old 04-14-17, 07:15 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 18,139
Received 55 Votes on 48 Posts
Amps of gen is 30 amps.

My circuits , currently 6 of them, are controlled by me. I can turn any on and off at will. Although the gen can run all circuits at same time . Example during sandy when I wanted to run my well pump I turned off all circuits but well and lighting as not to stress the gen.

Yes no tie handles.

Yes invertor.. I plan on, for now, plugging the inverter in where I plug the gen into.

I like the set up in this transfer switch that I have as my main panel can run on line power and I can switch off circuits to run on solar or gen at same time.

I want to bleed off high electric use loads and put them on solar. Probably during the day when full sun that charge controller will put say 40 amps into the batterys. Like running my window units A/C's. About 2400 watts.

I plan on a 4000 watt 120v inverter.

I want more circuits so I have flexibility to run a more varied items in the home.

Example,

100% lighting and TV,s at night/ all LEDs

3 a/c units ( window) 7.5 4.5 and 4.5 amps in daylight hours.
Re-fridge 400 watts 100% run time.

etc etc

I have this and am wondering if theres a better way then to tie the two hots togther as I have it in this switch. ( two hots to the Buss sides)

Note my inlet is a 3 prong and my gen is a 3 prong.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]79589[/ATTACH]
 
Attached Images  
  #4  
Old 04-15-17, 04:26 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
I asked the wrong question. I meant "wattage" of the generator, but I think you are satisfied it will handle your loads. You have had a working situation with the hots tied together, so I would just make a sticker to go on the face that is what has happened, just in case another person is involved with its operation.
 
  #5  
Old 04-15-17, 12:48 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 34 Votes on 26 Posts
Although they are routinely advertised as a transfer switch what you have is a transfer panel. A transfer switch would be a single switch that would transfer between the utility power and on-site power. Transfer switches are used with circuit breaker panels when supplying multiple circuits.

I also have a 120 volt only generator. To make my home compatible with a more standard 240/120 volt generator I wired my auxiliary circuit breaker panel through a triple pole (could have used a double pole)-double throw-center off 60 ampere switch.The switch has mechanical interlocks that prevent it from passing the center off position without stopping and requiring manually moving the stop tab to allow switching to the other position. This switch is fed from a 60 ampere circuit breaker in my service (main) panel OR from the generator inlet connection located outside the house near the generator location. All of this is wired in the standard 120/240 volt configuration so that any standard generator will plug in to the inlet and power the auxiliary panel.

However, on my generator I replaced the three-pole, 30 ampere receptacle with a four-pole model. I wired the X and Y terminals together to the single 120 volt "hot" lead while the neutral and equipment grounding conductors are wired as normal. I use a standard four-conductor interconnect cable between the generator and the house. I added a label on the generator stating it was 120 volts only with X and Y tied together.

The one caveat is that you may NOT have any "multi-wire branch circuits" (MWBCs) in the auxiliary panel or there exists the possibility of overloading the common neutral.

As for the original question of providing solar-generated power...I would do the same thing I have described, using an auxiliary circuit breaker panel that can be switched between the inverter and the utility. If you can find a four-position switch capable of handling the current (not easy and rather expensive) you could then have the ability to switch from any of the three sources. OR, you could have one switch select between utility and generator and a second switch (and panel) select from auxiliary panel #1 (utility or generator) or solar. With the both switches in the utility position all power used comes from the utility. With the first switch in utility and the second switch in solar only the circuits in the second auxiliary panel are being run on solar.
 
  #6  
Old 04-15-17, 01:15 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 18,139
Received 55 Votes on 48 Posts
Thanks for that Joel.

Just a quick note, my scenerio is that is I did a sub panel I would need to run everything in that sub of an auxilary source.

The switch I have I can power anyone of the loads on line or aux power. This would really be convenient when using solar and batterys with inverter.

Example. If my batterys are somewhat low from a no sun day I can just flip a lighting breaker only and run all other loads off line power.

What I am trying to achive is not neccesaraly to use for power outages..


My question really is whats best to get the panel I have to 120 volts.

1. Tie the two hots in my load center as I have? ( Its wire nutted)
2. Wire it back as a 240 inlet, hook up the two hots as normal, and do the mod in the cord itself?


I wired the X and Y terminals together to the single 120 volt "hot" lead
I would assume with a wire nut off the hot with two jumpers to X and Y? I would assume it difficult to get a hot and jumper into X or Y as its probably 10 gauge...
 
  #7  
Old 04-15-17, 10:12 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 34 Votes on 26 Posts
My question really is whats best to get the panel I have to 120 volts.

1. Tie the two hots in my load center as I have? ( Its wire nutted)
2. Wire it back as a 240 inlet, hook up the two hots as normal, and do the mod in the cord itself?

I wired the X and Y terminals together to the single 120 volt "hot" lead
I would assume with a wire nut off the hot with two jumpers to X and Y? I would assume it difficult to get a hot and jumper into X or Y as its probably 10 gauge...
First, let me clarify what I did on my generator. I replaced the original twist-lok three-wire receptacle with a four-wire model. I placed pigtails on the X and Y connections of that new receptacle and then connected the two pigtails with the single generator output lead that was originally connected to the three-wire receptacle using a barrel crimp.

You cannot make such a connection in a cord plug or connector as there simply is not enough room. So to answer question #2, you do NOT modify the cord itself. As for question #1, yes, tie the two "hot" leads together using pigtails to the single hot lead from the generator or the solar inverter.

Here is a company that sells transfer switches that would would work for transferring entire panels. http://www.mqtekindustrialsupplies.com/
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: