Electrical strip wire up

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Old 04-15-17, 12:39 PM
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Electrical strip wire up

I've got an metal cased electric strip with 10 outlets & i'd like to wire a cord to the lead end. The metal case splits apart. I've never seen wiring like this before so I'm looking for advise on how to wire in my plug.
I've got 3 wires, white, black & red. The white wire goes through all ten plug ins. The black wire goes through the first plug, skips the second plug, goes through the third plug, skips the forth and so on. The red wire isn't connected to the first plug and starts at the second plug, skipping the third ect.
At the end of the strip all three wires are wire nutted.
How would be the best was to wire a Three pronged cord to this set up? Does the red wire need to be grounded to the metal case?
I've included a rough Microsoft paint drawing below. The white wire is hard to see but it's on the very bottom. The yellow circles are the wire nuts.
 
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Old 04-15-17, 12:59 PM
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You have a multiwire strip. The red is one circuit , the black is the other circuit . Do you need two circuits to feed the strip?
 
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Old 04-15-17, 01:05 PM
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Does the red wire need to be grounded to the metal case?
ABSOLUTELY NOT!

What you have is a plug strip made to be used with a 120/240 volt multi-wire branch circuit. Half of the receptacles are on one circuit and the other half are on the second circuit. You CAN use it on a single circuit by connecting BOTH the black and red wires to the black wire of the standard cord set. White will connect to white and the green equipment grounding conductor of the cord set is bolted to the metal of the plug strip.

Note: It is possible this assembly is NOT made to be used with a cord set and is instead supposed to be hard-wired.
 
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Old 04-15-17, 01:55 PM
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A two circuit strip makes sense.

"Note: It is possible this assembly is NOT made to be used with a cord set and is instead supposed to be hard-wired."
What is the best way to find this out?
The strip is a solid core wire. If I got a big enough gauge cord set would I be ok?
 
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Old 04-15-17, 09:47 PM
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The best way to determine usage is to read the instructions. If you don't have the instructions is the back side of the strip enclosed and is there a clamping means to secure a cord? If the back is open or there is no way to secure the cord it is probably not meant to be used with a cord. Some pictures may help with a final determination.
 
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Old 04-17-17, 09:54 AM
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FYI, there are a number of manufacturers of similar assemblies, but the most well known is Wiremold Plugmold. They sell some versions of it at the big box stores.

In case you're looking for specific fittings or instructions.
 
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