Main electrical panel in bathroom?

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Old 05-01-17, 08:06 PM
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Main electrical panel in bathroom?

I want to bring a house up to code. The main electrical panel is located behind a mirror in the bathroom. Looks something like this:
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On the the web I found:
Panel in the bathroom
Is it legal to have an electrical panel located in a bathroom?
An electrical panel containing the service disconnecting means cannot be located in a bathroom [230.70(A)(2)]. [...]In other than dwelling units and guest rooms in motels or hotels, panelboards containing overcurrent devices can be located in bathrooms. The requirements of 110.26(A) regarding working space, (D) illumination and (E) dedicated space must be followed.
I assume the switch in my panel means it violates code? If it is in violation, do I just have to relocate the main switch to an acceptable location or do I have relocate the whole panel?
 
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Old 05-01-17, 08:38 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

A tricky question.
It appears that the main breaker for the service cannot be located in the bathroom. It doesn't specially mention panels.

The question is can a disconnect be installed outside and can the panel stay.
I read it as a yes. That would mean that the panel in the bathroom would have to be converted to a sub panel. Neutrals and grounds would need to be separated.

When was this panel installed..... year ?

I'm going to read further.
The other pros will be by and they may have a different take on the situation.
 
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Old 05-01-17, 08:54 PM
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When was this panel installed..... year ?
It was installed and passed an inspection in 1992. Also, not sure if it is relevant, but the house is being prep'd to sell.
 
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Old 05-01-17, 09:26 PM
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Well if it passed inspection at the time it was installed, that that should satisfy any real estate types/lenders/inspectors.

In my experience, if they find work which was done for which a permit was not applied for, then that is a big problem in a home sale. Not a problem in this case. So ask your real estate person if it is OK.
 
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Old 05-02-17, 01:37 AM
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I disagree with PJ. I checked both the 1993 and the 2002 NEC and in the 1993 230.70 deals ONLY with the service disconnecting means and its location. It does NOT specifically state it cannot be in a bathroom, indeed, it states the service disconnect shall be located at a readily accessible location nearest the point of entrance of the service conductors. It also states that the LOCAL authority is the final arbiter of what is allowable.

However, in the 2002 code 230.70 is enhanced by stating in 230.70(A)(2) that service disconnecting means may NOT be installed in bathrooms.

As for:
In other than dwelling units and guest rooms in motels or hotels, panelboards containing overcurrent devices can be located in bathrooms.
The definition of the term "dwelling unit" is such as to disqualify a residence from allowing a panelboard to be installed in a bathroom. It mainly would apply to a commercial structure such as an office building or other commercial / industrial usage having a panelboard in a washroom.

Bottom line, since the oldest reference I have is still later than the original construction I would say that you ARE grandfathered as long as no changes are made to the panel. As always, the LOCAL code will trump any provisions of the NEC. Usually any installation that was code compliant at the time of installation is grandfathered as long as the original installation and equipment are serviceable. For the best answer you need a copy of the local code enforced when the house was built.
 
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Old 05-02-17, 07:18 AM
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Thanks for the guidance, glad I stumbled onto this very helpful forum!
 
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Old 05-03-17, 11:27 AM
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I'll let the more experienced members argue the code compliance of it.

But considering your house was built recently, I think it is automatically grandfathered in. A home inspector may flag it as a potential issue, but you can just point to the fact that it was installed this way when the house was built.

Things like this come up a lot during home purchases. Most reasonable buyers will realize it's not a huge issue, and even if it's not 100% correct, it's not going to affect the house as a whole so should be able to be convinced that it's not a big deal.
 
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