resistor source?

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-03-17, 04:30 PM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
resistor source?

Help, need a 46 ohm +/- 10% Resistor but can't seem to find what I need on line and all the radio shacks around me have closed. If someone can post a link to a web site that will sell a small number (5 or 10) that would be great. Thanks Name:  resistor.jpg
Views: 308
Size:  39.7 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-03-17, 04:35 PM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 8,595
Received 29 Votes on 27 Posts
I just googled Resistor sales and came up with a page of sites.
https://www.google.com/search?q=resi...utf-8&oe=utf-8
 
  #3  
Old 05-03-17, 05:07 PM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
Thanks, I've looked through several sites and can't find an exact match. I guess I don't know enough about them. I didn't realize there are different watts? Does it matter? I was hoping to find an exact same one
 
  #4  
Old 05-03-17, 05:09 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,452
Received 15 Votes on 15 Posts
47 ohm is far more typical.
 
  #5  
Old 05-03-17, 05:11 PM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
And they are made of all different compositions who knew?
 
  #6  
Old 05-03-17, 05:13 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 3,138
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Search for carbon film resistor, through hole, at mouser.com and you will find what you need.

Wattage is hard to guess from the picture, but if you check the size you can narrow it down. If in doubt, you can always use a higher wattage resistor to replace a lower wattage of the same value (within reason).
 
  #7  
Old 05-03-17, 05:14 PM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
47 thanks I'll look for them
 
  #8  
Old 05-03-17, 05:17 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,452
Received 15 Votes on 15 Posts
Yellow violet blk is 47.........
 
  #9  
Old 05-03-17, 05:25 PM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
  #10  
Old 05-03-17, 05:51 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,452
Received 15 Votes on 15 Posts
yeah, perfect..........Mouser is good. digikey is good too.
 
  #11  
Old 05-03-17, 07:39 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,309
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
Are you sure that is resistor?
Looks like a axial inductor to me.
 
  #12  
Old 05-03-17, 07:55 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,452
Received 15 Votes on 15 Posts
Are you sure that is resistor?
Looks like a axial inductor to me.
I agree. Doorman; why do you think this part is bad? do you have an Ohmeter?
 
  #13  
Old 05-04-17, 04:28 AM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
Yes I do... I used my kline ohm meter and got about 7 Ohms, I used my peak ESR meter and got 30 Ohms, I didn't understand why I get two different readings.Here is a picture... the two caps above the "resistor" test bad and with the dark on the circuit board I thought it was bad tooName:  resistor3.jpg
Views: 368
Size:  46.3 KBName:  resistor2.jpg
Views: 198
Size:  35.9 KB
 
  #14  
Old 05-04-17, 06:20 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,452
Received 15 Votes on 15 Posts
The "L10" mark on the PCB gives it away as an inductor. And, 7 Ohms might be fine. ESR meters use a AC source, so any inductance should give a higher "esr". An ESR meter is not what one would normally use on a L, but on a C. Good eye Iambition.
 
  #15  
Old 05-04-17, 03:50 PM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
My apologizes for being electrically illiterate. I know the basics but still don't understand
Question 1... Is this or is this not a resistor?
Question 2... Why the different readings from two different meters? See pics below
Question 3...is it bad or good?Name:  res1.jpg
Views: 241
Size:  50.4 KBName:  res2.jpg
Views: 243
Size:  44.4 KB
 
  #16  
Old 05-04-17, 03:57 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,452
Received 15 Votes on 15 Posts
Do both meters read less than .5 with the leads shorted together? It would be great If you had some reference resistor on hand in the less than 100 Ohm range. In any case, neither meter will measure an inductor value; but, it's likely more likely to be good if its not open. It could have a shorted winding, though. Bottom line; this is beyond a simple DC measurement. L-C-R bridge is the proper instrument to measure reactance.
 
  #17  
Old 05-05-17, 08:11 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,944
Received 42 Votes on 40 Posts
uestion 1... Is this or is this not a resistor?
It is not a resistor. It is an inductor, which mimics some properties of a resistor and therefore causes the readings you're seeing on your multimeters. You need a different type of meter to fully asses this component.
 
  #18  
Old 05-05-17, 07:19 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,309
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
With reading you got from the multimeter, now I am sure it is inductor not resistor. Inductor will show up short circuit or low resistance to DC current, which ohm meter uses.
Since you are not getting open circuit and reads very low resistant, it is very unlikely your inductor is bad.
That inductor is completely sealed, so it unlikely that the inductance will ever change and only likely failure will be open circuit from overload/overheating.

You can purchased a cheap component tester off ebay if you want to measure inductance.
There is mega328 based esr, transistor, resistor, diode, capacitor, inductor tester. Around $15 or less.
 
  #19  
Old 05-06-17, 05:18 AM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
Thank you all for your help. After retesting, both of my multimeters are showing about 6 or 7 Ohms. a few more questions. 1- How do you tell the difference between Resistor and Inductor is it visual? 2- Is the color code values the same as a resistor so I can order a new one? Thanks for the tip, I will probably order that mega328 meter
 
  #20  
Old 05-06-17, 06:31 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,452
Received 15 Votes on 15 Posts
1- How do you tell the difference between Resistor and Inductor is it visual? 2- Is the color code values the same as a resistor so I can order a new one?
Same color code as resistors.

http://www.bourns.com/docs/Product-D...78f_series.pdf
https://www.seielect.com/Catalog/SEI-RNF_RNMF.pdf

visually, too subtle for me to 100% describe. The outline on the dipped L tend to be smoother than the R's. But both L and R's come with molded cases, too. No curved lines, pretty square ended.
 
  #21  
Old 05-06-17, 05:37 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,309
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
1- How do you tell the difference between Resistor and Inductor is it visual? 2- Is the color code values the same as a resistor so I can order a new one?
Resistors are usually tan or blue (except larger high power ones, which are usually green or gray with matte finish). Axial inductors are usually teal green.
I'm says usual because there are no standard for the color and there may be some manufactures using green resistor or blue inductors. I have seen teal green resistor, but not blue or tan inductor yet.
Also, the last band is silver on your inductor, which indicates 10% tolerance.
However, resistor of that size usually have matte finish (probably due to the heat it will generate).
Gloss finished resistor are usually 1/2W or less and tolerance is usually 5% (usually tan color and carbon resistor) or 2% (usually blue color and metal oxide resistor). Never seen 10% resistor that small. 10% are usually seen on 1W or higher. 10% resistor of 1/4W or less probably has no use because tolerance is too big.

Also, on the circuit board, component number starts with L for inductor and R for resistor.

Color code is same as the resistor, but the unit is uH (micro henries) instead of ohms.

Your inductor is 47uH with 10% tolerance.
 
  #22  
Old 05-07-17, 04:19 AM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
lambition... Thank you, your explination makes it much clearer now. I will save this for future reference. Last question... Does it matter which way a resistor or an inductor is installed in a circuit?
 

Last edited by Doorman2722; 05-07-17 at 05:03 AM.
  #23  
Old 05-07-17, 05:22 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,309
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
Does it matter which way a resistor or an inductor is installed in a circuit?
No, there is no polarity on resistors or inductors.
 
  #24  
Old 05-14-17, 02:06 PM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
So apparently I ordered the wrong value Inductor... that black stripe is actually brown making it 470 uH. Must be the lighting in my garage. So before I order again, My next question is there are several different watt ranges you can order... .25 or .50 or 1w. Does it really matter. This is on a garage door control panel (888LM) that converts older door openers to a triple frequency receiver (to cut through interference) and allows the user to run the door from a smart phone via module hooked to your router.
 
  #25  
Old 05-14-17, 02:14 PM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
Here is a picture of the old one being tested in my newly recommended
Mega328 Transistor Tester Diode Triode Capacitance ESR Meter MOS PNP/NPN M328 .... As you can see it's a little low but the ohms match my kline multimeterName:  inductor.jpg
Views: 204
Size:  50.8 KB
 
  #26  
Old 05-14-17, 04:21 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,452
Received 15 Votes on 15 Posts
That mega looks impressive. And, it comes with the ZIF connector for $15? wow.
 
  #27  
Old 05-14-17, 04:54 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,309
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
My next question is there are several different watt ranges you can order... .25 or .50 or 1w.
It is the best to match existing one. I think what you have is 1/2W.

Your measurement shows 0.42mH, which is 420uH. Your inductor value is 470uH with 10% (+-47uH) tolerance. This inexpensive meter has tolerance of it's own.
Therefore, I'd say your inductor is working as it should.

There is no need to order another inductor as that is not the problem. Why do you think inductor is the problem?
Like I said before, they rarely go bad. It is just a coil and will not go bad unless it is subjected to a over current condition and the final result will be burnt, discolored inductor or a open circuit. Your inductor has none of these signs.
Something else is wrong on your device. Now you have the meter, you can probably test capacitors and transistors with it.


That mega looks impressive. And, it comes with the ZIF connector for $15? wow.
It was originally a homebrew project from Russia and Chinese got hold of the idea and improved it and mass produced it at a dirt cheap price.
Somehow no body came up with a name for the device or even bothered putting a model number. It is just called Mega328 (micro controller it is based on) followed by list of whatever it is capable of measuring.
 
  #28  
Old 05-15-17, 04:23 AM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
I thought it was bad because of the dark spot next to it on the circuit board. I'll wait and try it out when I get the new caps. Thanks for all your help.Name:  resistor2.jpg
Views: 229
Size:  35.9 KB
 
  #29  
Old 05-15-17, 06:56 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,309
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
Looks like some sort of acid damage to the PCB pattern.
Check if the pattern is still good. Follow the visible pattern to the next solder pad and check with multimeter.
 
  #30  
Old 05-16-17, 03:21 AM
Doorman2722's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 884
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
I will be sure to do that, Thanks again
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: