Neutral conductor attached to ground screw

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  #1  
Old 05-06-17, 02:04 PM
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Neutral conductor attached to ground screw

Just opened up the junction box behind a light switch, building was from 1960s, the work looks original.

Are these romex wires? They don't have a bare ground conductor and the jacket doesn't seem 100% plastic looks almost fiberous.

In any case I am concerned about the neutral conductor connected to the screw that clamps the cable to the box. At first I thought may be this is just someone using the white conductor as ground since being a switch there it is not necessary to have a neutral conductor present back then. But when I go to remove the light fixture and looked at the ceiling box, the white conductor is tied to a bunch of neutral conductors.





Should I leave it like this or is there a way to properly do this?
 

Last edited by MiamiCuse; 05-06-17 at 02:53 PM.
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Old 05-06-17, 02:13 PM
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I am concerned about the neutral conductor connected to the screw that clamps the cable to the box.
That is VERY concerning.

White is neutral and should never be used as a ground. People are under the impression that since it connects to the same point as the ground in the panel that it can be used as a ground. Not correct and very dangerous.

You need to make sure no neutrals are tied to the boxes.

That is old cloth covered two conductor NM cable. There is no ground which means you must use two prong receptacles.
 
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Old 05-07-17, 07:17 AM
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If I don't use two prong receptacles, could I use GFCI receptacles instead?

If using GFCI receptacles is OK, once I figure out how the receptacles are wired, like for example if the wires run from east wall receptacle to north wall, down to west wall to south wall, can I use a GFCI on the first receptacle in series, and wire the rest of them from the "load" side of the first GFCI?
 
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Old 05-07-17, 08:28 AM
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If I don't use two prong receptacles, could I use GFCI receptacles instead?
Yes, only the first in line needs to be GFCI. The rest if fed from load can be three prong but all must be labeled GFCI protected. No ground.
 
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