Properly grounding a new GFI in an old bathroom

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Old 05-21-17, 08:10 AM
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Properly grounding a new GFI in an old bathroom

I own a home built in the mid 60s. None of the outlets are "properly" grounded, in that it originally had two prong outlets which were replaced by three prong outlets, but for purely cosmetic and resale value.
I am currently in the process of renovating a bathroom from the studs up, which makes this seems like a particularly great time to PROPERLY install a GFI in this bathroom, as well as run the necessary new wiring for this bathroom (as well as the a second bathroom which is back to back with it, as it is the next project) and to PROPERLY ground the GFIs that I will have in here as well as the other bathroom.

I already know I have to run new wiring, as well as install a 125V, single-phase, 20A breaker in the box for each bathroom. I already know I have to run wiring out to the breaker box (practically a brand new box, installed in January 2015). I know I need to install the GFIs, and I know that I will be using plastic gangs to put them in place.

But what I do NOT know (yet) is how I am going to ground the individual GFIs. Since these outlets are in the bathrooms, can I ground and bond them to the colds water copper or the iron vent pipe that are right there, or is there another better, proper way of doing it?

Tim
 
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Old 05-21-17, 08:32 AM
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20A breaker in the box for each bathroom
Technically, it is not required to install a separate 20A circuit for each bathroom. They can share the circuit as long as the circuit only serves the receptacles in the bathrooms. You can use two circuits if you choose.


can I ground and bond them to the colds water copper or the iron vent pipe that are right there, or is there another better, proper way of doing it?
If you are going to run a new 20 amp circuit(s) for the bathrooms you will have the grounding path already in the NM cable. If you do not use NM cable, you will need to add a ground wire as required by code unless it is an approved grounding path (IE: EMT). You may not use a water pipe or steel vent pipe as a grounding path.
 
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Old 05-21-17, 08:33 AM
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The new cables you will run back to the main breaker panel will have ground wires that you use to ground the GFCIs. You do not ground to water pipes or anything else.

The ground wire in the cables gets connected to the ground buss bar in the main panel.

Good luck with your project!
 
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