2 Power sources. 1 output

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Old 06-01-17, 10:25 PM
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2 Power sources. 1 output

I want to build a Lichtenberg machine for woodworking projects. It will have a 2000v 500mA microwave oven transformer for the deep burning and a 9000v 60mA neon transformer for the fine details. I want it to be 1 unit with 1 set of high voltage lead.
A 3 position switch will determine which unit is on and will have indicator lights for safety.
My issue is I don't know how the common connection on the secondary should be hooked up so that it doesn't back feed in the unit that isn't in use? On the picture, the question marks are my area of concern. Name:  IMG_20170601_220715.jpg
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Old 06-01-17, 10:46 PM
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I would keep them as two separate units.

I don't think you would be able to find a cost effective switch or a switch that could even safely switch that high a voltage. You would have to use some type of very expensive high voltage isolation relay.
 
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Old 06-01-17, 11:07 PM
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I have them separately right now... Im hoping there is a cheap way to combine them, but you may be right...
The principle is pretty simple but I can't figure out how to switch them
 
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Old 06-02-17, 03:54 PM
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As PJ posted, the issue is switching voltage that high will be expensive no matter what route you take. You would be better off switching the primary (120 volt) side.
 
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Old 06-02-17, 05:09 PM
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He does want to switch the primary but he wants to also share secondaries on one set of output leads. Which means dual switching.

I was looking at some air/vacuum high voltage switches. They run in the hundreds of dollars.
 
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Old 06-02-17, 07:14 PM
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Putting 9000v on a 2000v secondary would be very bad.

Perhaps he could just have separate taps on the outside of the machine similar to an older type welder. To change voltage he would just move the out put leads to the proper tap.
 
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