Old "screw in" electrical fuse system


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Old 06-26-17, 09:52 AM
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Old "screw in" electrical fuse system

Electric system in house is very old & dangerous. One fuse alone runs living room,two bedrooms,hallway,washer&dryer.Constantly hot,blowing fuses.How simple would it be to run washer & dryer to on breaker box or at very least how reasonable to have done as I'm on tight budget but don't want fire killing my family?
 
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Old 06-26-17, 10:02 AM
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Just temp fixed as I can't redo whole system but at least could run washer & dryer to separate box.
 
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Old 06-26-17, 11:58 AM
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This is probably going to require a new service along with the panel. Pricing is going to need to be given by a local licensed contractor. There are too many variables.
 
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Old 06-26-17, 02:57 PM
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Do you have any pull-out 240 volt fuse holders?

Please post a picture of the fuse box with internal cover off. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/li...rt-images.html
 
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Old 07-01-17, 01:37 PM
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It's two pull outs,one main and one range.Both have two 60 amp cartridge fuses in them so I guess it's 240.Then five screw in fuses underneath that take 20TL buses screw ins.
 
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Old 07-01-17, 01:49 PM
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You have two 60A pullouts. That means the system is fused to supply 120A of 240v power. You more than likely have a 100A service.
 
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Old 07-01-17, 02:02 PM
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Here is fuse box pic. Each pull out box contains two 60 amp fuses each.

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Last edited by ray2047; 07-01-17 at 03:09 PM. Reason: Rotate image,
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Old 07-01-17, 02:11 PM
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And you're right about 120A of 240V.It says that on box.But there's just way to much running off on of those 20Tl fuses that it always blows & worries me as I have lil girl & family.Though I know u can't believe all u hear,I was told I could at least run washer & dryer on own breaker box for not much money.I don't have money to rewire whole house plus I just got done replacing pressure tank on water well for $500.
 

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Old 07-01-17, 03:15 PM
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Those 120v circuit fuses are almost certainly intended as 15 amp circuits so any 2o amp fuses with #14 wires need to be changed immediately.

Do you have an electric stove? If not I see a possible temp solution. Run a subpanel from the range fuse block.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 07-01-17 at 08:24 PM.
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Old 07-01-17, 06:21 PM
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I would look at changing the fuse panel to a small 100 amp main breaker panel. This would give you expansion room for dedicated circuits for the washer and dryer.
 
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Old 07-02-17, 11:12 AM
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Do you have space on the wall to install a new panel without removing the old panel first?

The new panel does not have to be next to the old panel.

It is quite common to install a new panel and a new service entrance while the old panel is still in use. At the appointed moment the power company disconnects the service wires (service drop) fronm the old service entrance outside and connect them (or a new heavier set of wires) to the new service entrance.

Then you install a (#6 for a 60 amp main fuse pullout) Romex cable from a new matching breaker set in a pair of side slots in the new panel over to the top of the old panel. Now the old panel is fully funded, er, fully powered to work the same as before. And the old service entrance is connected to nothing at both ends.

You can then add new modern circuits from the new panel and move circuits one at a time from the old panel to the new panel at your leisure.

Ususally a separate permit is needed to install the new panel and new service entrance.

Technically, before you install that washer/dryer circuit you need to do a load analysis (calculations published at the back of the NEC and in some other places). If the results indicate a need for more amperes or watts than your service provides then you must install a new, larger, service and panel.
 
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Old 07-08-17, 11:17 AM
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I have gas well so many appliances run off gas such as stove & such. There looks to be enough room to add new panel but as stated don't know if I got the funds. Was hoping to take load off fuse running most stuff by running separate box for washer & dryer cuz it's cheap.Even then I don't know how much that job would cost or if I could do it myself as i not electrician.
 
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Old 07-08-17, 11:20 AM
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And eat are you saying mostve those fuses should be 15TL?
 
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Old 07-08-17, 04:57 PM
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And eat are you saying mostve those fuses should be 15
Yes, it is likely almost all 120 volt circuits on a panel that old would have likely been run with #14 wire on 15 amp fuses. A 20 amp fuse on #14 is a fire waiting to happen. Add in age deteriorated insulation on the wires and it just becomes a waiting game. Check your wire sizes.
 
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Old 07-09-17, 06:05 AM
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I would certainly agree with Ray, that was my first thought when I saw all of those 20 amp fuses, that panel I believe is called a Main Range and 6,if you have a gas range then what is that other 60 amp pull out feeding?
Geo
 
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Old 07-09-17, 07:17 AM
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Yes, it is likely almost all 120 volt circuits on a panel that old would have likely been run with #14 wire on 15 amp fuses.
Aren't those screw in fuses sized so a 20 amp will not work in a 15 amp hole? Its been 50+ years living in our old house but it seems to me that is how they worked.

IF that is the case, it should be #12 wire but you'd have to look at the wire to be sure. Crazy things do happen.
 
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Old 07-09-17, 07:32 AM
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Apparently those Edison medium base fuse sockets, for better or worse, have equipped with TL adapters that take only 20 amp fuses.
 
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Old 07-09-17, 07:33 AM
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Aren't those screw in fuses sized so a 20 amp will not work in a 15 amp hole? Its been 50+ years living in our old house but it seems to me that is how they worked.
You had 'rejection base' type S fuses. There's screw-in adapter that you can install in the edison socket that coverts it and prevents a larger fuse being installed. Once screwed in, this adapter cannot be easily removed. These are supposed to be installed when an electrician finds evidence of "tampering or overfusing". Like in the OP's case.

OP- You might want to invest in some Edison base circuit breakers. That way you just press a button instead of buying new fuses. Once you fuse things to the proper size you're going to have even more trips than you do now. To me blown fuses don't seem so much of a nuisance when you're not having to throw something away and buy new each time.

Slightly off topic, but I hear from electricians all the time that #14 used to be legal for 20A way back when. (Normally I hear this from folks too young to have been there themselves.) I don't know if there's any truth to that at all, but it sorta makes sense: K&T had superior cooling ability, plus houses didn't have so much insulation back then.
 
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Old 07-09-17, 09:43 AM
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Double check the pull outs in your panel. I am working on an older house with a panel similar to yours. Unlike in a true split bus panel, pulling the "main" fuse block (has 60 amp fuses) in mine also kills the "range" block and circuit.
 
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Old 07-09-17, 08:43 PM
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If you have a gas range and the 60 amp range fuse is unused you have a fairly simple way to install a subpanel, just use the range fuse.
 
 

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